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Climate friendly technology transfer in the energy sector: A case study of Iran

Listed author(s):
  • Talaei, Alireza
  • Ahadi, Mohammad Sadegh
  • Maghsoudy, Soroush
Registered author(s):

    The energy sector is the biggest contributor of anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere in Iran. However, abundant potential for implementing low-carbon technologies offers considerable emissions mitigation potential in this sector, and technology transfer is expected to play an important role in the widespread roll-out of these technologies. In the current work, globally existing low-carbon energy technologies that are compatible with the energy sector of Iran are identified and then prioritised against different criteria (i.e. Multi Criteria Decision Analysis). Results of technology prioritisation and a comprehensive literature review were then applied to conduct a SWOT analysis and develop a policy package aiming at facilitating the transfer of low carbon technologies to the country. Results of technology prioritisation suggest that the transport, oil and gas and electricity sectors are the highest priority sectors from technological needs perspective. In the policy package, while fuel price reform and environmental regulations are categorised as high priority policies, information campaigns and development of human resources are considered to have moderate effects on the process of technology transfer.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421513009749
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 64 (2014)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 349-363

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:64:y:2014:i:c:p:349-363
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2013.09.050
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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