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Short-run price and income elasticity of gasoline demand: Evidence from Lebanon

  • Ben Sita, Bernard
  • Marrouch, Walid
  • Abosedra, Salah

We empirically estimate the demand for gasoline in the presence of multiple shifts caused by structural breaks using monthly data from Lebanon covering the period 2000:M1–2010:M12. Consistent with most studies in the literature, our study reports that gasoline is price and income inelastic in the short-run. However, when a single and multiple breaks are introduced, the consumers’ responsiveness to gasoline price and income increase. Since both price and income elasticity are sensitive to structural changes, a policy that pleads for a flat excise tax may not be optimal with respect to either the cyclical pattern of government revenues or the internalization of international environment standards.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

Volume (Year): 46 (2012)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 109-115

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Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:46:y:2012:i:c:p:109-115
DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2012.03.041
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