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Accounting for behavioral effects of increases in the carbon dioxide (CO2) tax in revenue estimation in Sweden

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  • Hammar, Henrik
  • Sjöström, Magnus

Abstract

In this paper we describe how behavioral responses of carbon dioxide (CO2) tax increases are accounted for in tax revenue estimation in Sweden. The rationale for developing a method for this is a mix between that a CO2 tax is a primary climate policy tool aiming to reduce CO2 emissions and that the CO2 tax generates sizable tax revenues.

Suggested Citation

  • Hammar, Henrik & Sjöström, Magnus, 2011. "Accounting for behavioral effects of increases in the carbon dioxide (CO2) tax in revenue estimation in Sweden," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 6672-6676, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:10:p:6672-6676
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brannlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy, 2004. "A dynamic analysis of interfuel substitution for Swedish heating plants," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 961-976, November.
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    5. Martin S. Feldstein, 2008. "Effects of Taxes on Economic Behavior," NBER Working Papers 13745, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Feldstein, Martin, 2008. "Effects of Taxes on Economic Behavior," Scholarly Articles 2943922, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    7. Brännlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy & Marklund, Per-Olov, 2011. "Environmental performance and climate policy," Sustainable Investment and Corporate Governance Working Papers 2011/1, Sustainable Investment Research Platform.
    8. Söderholm, Patrik & Wårell, Linda, 2011. "Market opening and third party access in district heating networks," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 742-752, February.
    9. Brännlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy & Marklund, Per-Olov, 2011. "Environmental Performance and Climate Policy," CERE Working Papers 2011:6, CERE - the Center for Environmental and Resource Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fang, Guochang & Tian, Lixin & Fu, Min & Sun, Mei, 2013. "The impacts of carbon tax on energy intensity and economic growth – A dynamic evolution analysis on the case of China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 17-28.
    2. Sanz-Díaz, María Teresa & Velasco-Morente, Francisco & Yñiguez, Rocío & Díaz-Calleja, Emilio, 2017. "An analysis of Spain's global and environmental efficiency from a European Union perspective," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 183-193.
    3. Wei Li & Hao Li & Shuang Sun, 2015. "China’s Low-Carbon Scenario Analysis of CO 2 Mitigation Measures towards 2050 Using a Hybrid AIM/CGE Model," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(5), pages 1-27, April.
    4. Mundaca, Luis & Román, Rocio & Cansino, José M., 2015. "Towards a Green Energy Economy? A macroeconomic-climate evaluation of Sweden’s CO2 emissions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 196-209.
    5. Miller, Mark & Alberini, Anna, 2016. "Sensitivity of price elasticity of demand to aggregation, unobserved heterogeneity, price trends, and price endogeneity: Evidence from U.S. Data," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 235-249.

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