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Energy consumption and economic growth: Evidence from the economic community of West African States (ECOWAS)

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  • Ouedraogo, Nadia S.
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    Access to modern energy is believed to be a prerequisite for sustainable development, poverty alleviation and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140988312003003
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Economics.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 637-647

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:36:y:2013:i:c:p:637-647
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2012.11.011
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco

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