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Testing functional forms in energy modeling: An application of the Bayesian approach to U.S. electricity demand

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  • Xiao, Ni
  • Zarnikau, Jay
  • Damien, Paul

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  • Xiao, Ni & Zarnikau, Jay & Damien, Paul, 2007. "Testing functional forms in energy modeling: An application of the Bayesian approach to U.S. electricity demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 158-166, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:29:y:2007:i:2:p:158-166
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    1. Zarnikau, Jay, 2003. "Functional forms in energy demand modeling," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 603-613, November.
    2. Uri+, Noel D., 1982. "The industrial demand for energy," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 69-84.
    3. Uri, Noel D., 1982. "The industrial demand for energy," Resources and Energy, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 27-57, March.
    4. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
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    1. Ohtsuka, Yoshihiro & Oga, Takashi & Kakamu, Kazuhiko, 2010. "Forecasting electricity demand in Japan: A Bayesian spatial autoregressive ARMA approach," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 54(11), pages 2721-2735, November.
    2. Fullerton, Thomas M., Jr. & Ramirez, David A. & Walke, Adam G., 2013. "An Econometric Analysis of Population Change in Arkansas," MPRA Paper 59588, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 11 Nov 2013.
    3. Woo, C.K. & Liu, Y. & Zarnikau, J. & Shiu, A. & Luo, X. & Kahrl, F., 2018. "Price elasticities of retail energy demands in the United States: New evidence from a panel of monthly data for 2001–2016," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 222(C), pages 460-474.
    4. Woo, C.K. & Shiu, A. & Liu, Y. & Luo, X. & Zarnikau, J., 2018. "Consumption effects of an electricity decarbonization policy: Hong Kong," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 887-902.
    5. Mizobuchi, Kenichi, 2008. "An empirical study on the rebound effect considering capital costs," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2486-2516, September.
    6. Thomas M. Fullerton & Felipe I. Galan & Wm. Doyle Smith & Adam G. Walke, 2014. "An Empirical Analysis of Migratory Flows to the United States," Applied Economics and Finance, Redfame publishing, vol. 1(2), pages 11-20, November.
    7. Wang, Siyan & Sun, Xun & Lall, Upmanu, 2017. "A hierarchical Bayesian regression model for predicting summer residential electricity demand across the U.S.A," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 140(P1), pages 601-611.
    8. Ken-ichi Mizobuchi & Hisashi Tanizaki, 2014. "On estimation of almost ideal demand system using moving blocks bootstrap and pairs bootstrap methods," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 1221-1250, December.
    9. Bessec, Marie & Fouquau, Julien, 2008. "The non-linear link between electricity consumption and temperature in Europe: A threshold panel approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2705-2721, September.
    10. Psiloglou, B.E. & Giannakopoulos, C. & Majithia, S. & Petrakis, M., 2009. "Factors affecting electricity demand in Athens, Greece and London, UK: A comparative assessment," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 1855-1863.
    11. Salisu, Afees A. & Ayinde, Taofeek O., 2016. "Modeling energy demand: Some emerging issues," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1470-1480.
    12. Karimu, Amin & Brännlund, Runar, 2013. "Functional form and aggregate energy demand elasticities: A nonparametric panel approach for 17 OECD countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 19-27.
    13. Kurt Kratena & Ina Meyer & Michael Wüger, 2009. "Ökonomische, technologische und soziodemographische Einflussfaktoren der Energienachfrage," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 82(7), pages 525-538, July.
    14. T. M. Fullerton & A. G. Walke, 2013. "Public transportation demand in a border metropolitan economy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(27), pages 3922-3931, September.
    15. Rowland, Christopher S. & Mjelde, James W. & Dharmasena, Senarath, 2017. "Policy implications of considering pre-commitments in U.S. aggregate energy demand system," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 406-413.
    16. Contreras, Sergio & Smith, Wm. Doyle & Fullerton, Thomas M., Jr., 2010. "U.S. commercial electricity consumption," MPRA Paper 34855, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 22 May 2011.
    17. Chan, Joshua C.C. & Grant, Angelia L., 2016. "Fast computation of the deviance information criterion for latent variable models," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 847-859.
    18. Agnolucci, Paolo, 2009. "The effect of the German and British environmental taxation reforms: A simple assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 3043-3051, August.
    19. Fullerton, Thomas M., Jr. & Walke, Adam G. & Villavicencio, Diana, 2015. "An Econometric Approach for Modeling Population Change in Doña Ana County, New Mexico," MPRA Paper 71141, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 28 Jan 2015.
    20. Angela Köppl & Michael Wüger, 2007. "Determinanten der Energienachfrage der privaten Haushalte unter Berücksichtigung von Lebensstilen," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 29999, June.
    21. Li, Gong & Shi, Jing, 2012. "Applications of Bayesian methods in wind energy conversion systems," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 1-8.

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