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I'd lie for you

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  • Michailidou, Georgia
  • Rotondi, Valentina

Abstract

We examine experimentally whether individuals engage in altruistic lying, and whether they are more inclined to engage in altruistic lying for in-groups rather than out-groups. We embark in a lab-in-the-field experiment to take advantage of a naturally occurring in-group – out-group formation of Southerner and Northerner Italians. The cultural variations between Northern and Southern Italy appear to trigger different behavior across the two participant pools. Although neither Northerners nor Southerners are willing to lie to help an out-group, the latter are significantly more likely to lie to help ‘one of their people’.

Suggested Citation

  • Michailidou, Georgia & Rotondi, Valentina, 2019. "I'd lie for you," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 181-192.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:118:y:2019:i:c:p:181-192
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2019.05.014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Altruistic lies; In-group favoritism; Lying; Lab-in-the-field experiment; Italy;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • C99 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Other
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics

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