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Complicity without Connection or Communication

Author

Listed:
  • Abigail Barr

    () (School of Economics, University of Nottingham)

  • Georgia Michailidou

    () (University of Nottingham, School of Economics)

Abstract

We use a novel experiment to investigate whether people aim to coordinate when, to do so, they have to lie; and are more willing to lie when, in doing so, they are aiming to coordinate with a potential accomplice, i.e., another with whom coordination would be beneficial and who is facing the same individual and mutual incentives and the same moral dilemma. We find that people often aim to coordinate when they have to lie to do so and that having a potential accomplice increases willingness to lie even when that potential accomplice is a stranger and communication is not possible.

Suggested Citation

  • Abigail Barr & Georgia Michailidou, 2016. "Complicity without Connection or Communication," Discussion Papers 2016-14, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
  • Handle: RePEc:not:notcdx:2016-14
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    complicity; lying; coordination; die rolling task;

    JEL classification:

    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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