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What makes Islamic banks different? A multivariate approach

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  • Bitar, Mohammad
  • Madiès, Philippe
  • Taramasco, Ollivier

Abstract

Using data from 8615 banks (including 123 Islamic banks) in 124 developed and developing countries for the period between 2006 and 2012, we examine the financial characteristics that distinguish between conventional and Islamic banks. As banks’ financial characteristics are multi-faceted concepts, our indicators are constructed using principal component analysis. We find that Islamic banks are more capitalized, more liquid and more profitable, but have more volatile earnings compared to US and European banks. However, similarities in terms of liquidity and earnings volatility are more noticeable when the sample is limited to banks operating in countries where both systems coexist. Finally, we find that higher capital makes the returns of Islamic banks more volatile, while higher liquidity decreases the profitability of conventional banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Bitar, Mohammad & Madiès, Philippe & Taramasco, Ollivier, 2017. "What makes Islamic banks different? A multivariate approach," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 215-235.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecosys:v:41:y:2017:i:2:p:215-235
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecosys.2016.06.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Naif Alsagr & Stefan F. Van Hemmen Almazor, 2020. "Oil Rent, Geopolitical Risk and Banking Sector Performance," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 10(5), pages 305-314.
    2. Alshammari, Ahmad Alrazni & Alhabshi, Syed Musa & Saiti, Buerhan, 2019. "The impact of oil prices and the financial market on cost efficiency in the insurance and Takaful sectors: Evidence from a stochastic frontier analysis," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 43(3).
    3. Al-Shboul, Mohammad & Maghyereh, Aktham & Hassan, Abul & Molyneux, Phillip, 2020. "Political risk and bank stability in the Middle East and North Africa region," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).
    4. Hassan, M. Kabir & Khan, Ashraf & Paltrinieri, Andrea, 2019. "Liquidity risk, credit risk and stability in Islamic and conventional banks," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 17-31.
    5. Belkhir, Mohamed & Grira, Jocelyn & Hassan, M. Kabir & Soumaré, Issouf, 2019. "Islamic banks and political risk: International evidence," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 39-55.
    6. Smaoui, Houcem & Ghouma, Hatem, 2020. "Sukuk market development and Islamic banks’ capital ratios," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(C).
    7. Bitar, Mohammad & Kabir Hassan, M. & Hippler, William J., 2018. "The determinants of Islamic bank capital decisions," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 48-68.
    8. Albaity, Mohamed & Mallek, Ray Saadaoui & Noman, Abu Hanifa Md., 2019. "Competition and bank stability in the MENA region: The moderating effect of Islamic versus conventional banks," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 310-325.
    9. Houcem Smaou & Hatem Ghouma, 2019. "Sukuk Market Development and Islamic Banks’ Capital Ratios," Working Papers 1329, Economic Research Forum, revised 21 Aug 2019.
    10. Louhichi, Awatef & Boujelbene, Younes, 2020. "Credit risk pricing and the rationality of lending decision-making within dual banking systems: A parametric approach," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 44(1).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Principal component analysis; Islamic banks; Capital; Liquidity; Profitability;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C38 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Classification Methdos; Cluster Analysis; Principal Components; Factor Analysis
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • P5 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

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