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Climate change and farm-level adaptation decisions and strategies in drought-prone and groundwater-depleted areas of Bangladesh: an empirical investigation

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  • Alauddin, Mohammad
  • Sarker, Md Abdur Rashid

Abstract

Despite recognizing the vulnerability of Bangladesh's agriculture to climate change, the existing literature pays limited attention to a rigorous, quantitative analysis of farm-level data to investigate rice farmers' preferred adaptation strategies, perceived barriers, and policy implications. By employing data from 1800 Bangladeshi farm-households in eight drought-prone and groundwater-depleted districts of three climatic zones and logit models, this study breaks new ground in investigating farm-level adaptation to climate change.

Suggested Citation

  • Alauddin, Mohammad & Sarker, Md Abdur Rashid, 2014. "Climate change and farm-level adaptation decisions and strategies in drought-prone and groundwater-depleted areas of Bangladesh: an empirical investigation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 204-213.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:106:y:2014:i:c:p:204-213
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.07.025
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alauddin, Mohammad & Sharma, Bharat R., 2013. "Inter-district rice water productivity differences in Bangladesh: An empirical exploration and implications," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 210-218.
    2. Kurukulasuriya, Pradeep & Mendelsohn, Robert, 2008. "Crop switching as a strategy for adapting to climate change," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(1), pages 1-22, March.
    3. Nhemachena, Charles & Hassan, Rashid M., 2007. "Micro-level analysis of farmers' adaptation to climate change in Southern Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 714, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    6. Yesuf, Mahmud & di Falco, Salvatore & Deressa, Temesgen & Ringler, Claudia & Kohlin, Gunnar, 2008. "The impact of climate change and adaptation on food production in low-income countries: Evidence from the Nile Basin, Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 828, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Alauddin, Mohammad & Quiggin, John, 2008. "Agricultural intensification, irrigation and the environment in South Asia: Issues and policy options," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 111-124, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Zeenatul Islam & Mohammad Alauddin & Md. Abdur Rashid Sarker, 2017. "Farmers’ perception on climate change-driven rice production loss in drought-prone and groundwater-depleted areas of Bangladesh: An ordered probit analysis," Discussion Papers Series 579, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    2. M. MEHEDI HASAN & Md. ABDUR RASHID SARKER & JEFF GOW, 2016. "Assessment Of Climate Change Impacts On Aman And Boro Rice Yields In Bangladesh," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 7(03), pages 1-21, August.
    3. Fan, Yubing & McCann, Laura E., 2015. "Households' Adoption of Drought Tolerant Plants: An Adaptation to Climate Change?," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205544, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. repec:spr:nathaz:v:89:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11069-017-2994-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:spr:nathaz:v:92:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11069-018-3250-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:ecolec:v:144:y:2018:i:c:p:139-147 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:spr:climat:v:148:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s10584-018-2214-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Alam, GM Monirul & Alam, Khorshed & Mushtaq, Shahbaz, 2016. "Influence of institutional access and social capital on adaptation decision: Empirical evidence from hazard-prone rural households in Bangladesh," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 243-251.
    9. Md. Jahangir Kabir & Mohammad Alauddin & Steven Crimp, 2016. "Farm-level Adaptation to Climate Change in Western Bangladesh: An Analysis of Adaptation Dynamics, Profitability and Risks," Discussion Papers Series 576, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    10. repec:ags:jlaare:258000 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Md. Nazir Hossain & Swapna Chowdhury & Shitangsu Kumar Paul, 2016. "Farmer-level adaptation to climate change and agricultural drought: empirical evidences from the Barind region of Bangladesh," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 83(2), pages 1007-1026, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; Drought severity; Groundwater depletion; Adaptation barriers; Resource-depleting adaptation; Science-driven adaptation; Enabling environment;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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