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2004 Minority Education Reform and pupil performance in Latvia

Author

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  • Ivlevs, Artjoms
  • King, Roswitha M.

Abstract

One quarter of all schoolchildren in Latvia go to the publicly funded minority (predominantly Russian) schools. In 2004, the language of instruction in minority schools was changed from essentially minority language to a composite of 60% Latvian and 40% minority. This paper studies the effects of this ‘60/40’ reform on the academic performance of pupils in minority schools. Using data on 2002–2011 centralised exam results for the universe of Latvia's secondary schools, we find that there has been a significant deterioration in the exam performance of minority schools relative to that of majority schools after the reform year 2004. The negative effects were most pronounced in the early years following the reform.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivlevs, Artjoms & King, Roswitha M., 2014. "2004 Minority Education Reform and pupil performance in Latvia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 151-166.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:38:y:2014:i:c:p:151-166
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2013.08.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Hughes, 2005. "‘Exit’ in Deeply Divided Societies: Regimes of Discrimination in Estonia and Latvia and the Potential for Russophone Migration," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(4), pages 739-762, November.
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    3. Gao, Wenshu & Smyth, Russell, 2011. "Economic returns to speaking 'standard Mandarin' among migrants in China's urban labour market," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 342-352, April.
    4. Casale, Daniela & Posel, Dorrit, 2011. "English language proficiency and earnings in a developing country: The case of South Africa," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 385-393, August.
    5. Friesen, Jane & Krauth, Brian, 2011. "Ethnic enclaves in the classroom," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 656-663, October.
    6. Jensen, Peter & Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz, 2011. "The effect of immigrant concentration in schools on native and immigrant children's reading and math skills," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1503-1515.
    7. Godoy, Ricardo & Reyes-Garcia, Victoria & Seyfried, Craig & Huanca, Tomas & Leonard, William R. & McDade, Thomas & Tanner, Susan & Vadez, Vincent, 2007. "Language skills and earnings: Evidence from a pre-industrial economy in the Bolivian Amazon," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 349-360, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Di Paolo, Antonio, 2018. "Bilingual schooling and earnings: Evidence from a language-in-education reform," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 90-101.
    2. Taylor, Stephen & von Fintel, Marisa, 2016. "Estimating the impact of language of instruction in South African primary schools: A fixed effects approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 75-89.
    3. Victor Ginsburgh & Shlomo Weber, 2018. "The Economics of Language," Working Papers ECARES 2018-18, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Costs; Educational economics; School choice; Bilingual education; Latvia; Minorities; Policy evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty

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