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Minorities on the move? Assessing post-enlargement emigration intentions of Latvia’s Russian speaking minority

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  • Artjoms Ivlevs

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Abstract

Are ethnic minorities more likely to emigrate from the new EU Member States? Who are the potential minority and majority migrants? This paper studies emigration intentions of the Russian speaking minority in Latvia after the 2004 EU enlargement. Using a survey on emigration intentions conducted in 2005, I show that the minority is more likely to emigrate than the majority. For the Russian speakers, higher education levels tend to be associated with higher probability of emigration, suggesting a minority brain drain. These findings can be explained by (1) linguistic and citizenship policies potentially disadvantaging Russian speakers in the Latvian labour market; (2) family migration capital; and (3) low acceptance of the way in which minority education is provided. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Artjoms Ivlevs, 2013. "Minorities on the move? Assessing post-enlargement emigration intentions of Latvia’s Russian speaking minority," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(1), pages 33-52, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:51:y:2013:i:1:p:33-52
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-012-0534-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Hughes, 2005. "‘Exit’ in Deeply Divided Societies: Regimes of Discrimination in Estonia and Latvia and the Potential for Russophone Migration," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(4), pages 739-762, November.
    2. Gil S. Epstein & Ira N. Gang, 2006. "The Influence of Others on Migration Plans," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(4), pages 652-665, November.
    3. Peter Sanfey & Harry Papapanagos, 2001. "Intention to emigrate in transition countries: the case of Albania," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(3), pages 491-504.
    4. Kristjan-Olari Leping & Ott Toomet, 2007. "Ethnic Wage Gap And Political Break-Ups: Estonia During Political And Economic Transition," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 53, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    5. Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2003. "Ethnic discrimination and the migration of skilled labor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 159-172, February.
    6. Mckenzie, David & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "Network effects and the dynamics of migration and inequality: Theory and evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 1-24, September.
    7. Stephen Drinkwater & Peter Ingram, 2009. "How Different are the British in their Willingness to Move? Evidence from International Social Survey Data," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 287-303.
    8. Silke Uebelmesser, 2006. "To Go or Not to Go: Emigration from Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7(2), pages 211-231, May.
    9. Artjoms Ivlevs & Roswitha King, 2012. "Family Migration Capital and Migration Intentions," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 118-129, March.
    10. Thomas Liebig & Alfonso Sousa‐Poza, 2004. "Migration, Self‐Selection and Income Inequality: An International Analysis," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(1), pages 125-146, February.
    11. Hazans, Mihails, 2005. "Unemployment and the earnings structure in Latvia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3504, The World Bank.
    12. van Dalen, H.P. & Henkens, K., 2008. "Emigration Intentions : Mere Words or True Plans? Explaining International Migration Intentions and Behavior," Discussion Paper 2008-60, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    13. Massey, Douglas S., 2005. "Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199282760.
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    Cited by:

    1. Artjoms Ivlevs, 2015. "Happy Moves? Assessing the Link between Life Satisfaction and Emigration Intentions," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(3), pages 335-356, August.
    2. Ivlevs, Artjoms, 2016. "Remittances and Informal Work," IZA Discussion Papers 10196, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    J15; J61;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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