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Kosovo - Winning Its Independence but Losing Its People? Recent Evidence on Emigration Intentions

  • Artjoms Ivlevs
  • Roswitha M. King
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    Kosovo declared its independence from Serbia in February 2008, but substantial proportions of its population are expressing their lack of confidence by preparing to emigrate. In this paper we present evidence from a customized post-independence survey (1367 face-to face interviews) on emigration intentions in Kosovo, carried out in June 2008. 30 % of the Albanian-speaking-majority respondents have taken concrete steps to move abroad, and emigration intentions have again risen to their pre-independence peak. Strikingly, it is the better educated and those with higher incomes that are more likely to exit. Ethnic Serbs (the largest minority group) are less likely to emigrate than Kosovo’s ethnic majority.

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    File URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gep/documents/papers/2009/09-17.pdf
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    Paper provided by University of Nottingham, GEP in its series Discussion Papers with number 09/17.

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    Handle: RePEc:not:notgep:09/17
    Contact details of provider: Postal: School of Economics University of Nottingham University Park Nottingham NG7 2RD
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    1. Massey, Douglas S., 2005. "Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199282760.
    2. Stephen Drinkwater & Peter Ingram, 2009. "How Different are the British in their Willingness to Move? Evidence from International Social Survey Data," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 287-303.
    3. repec:dgr:kubcen:200860 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Epstein, Gil S. & Gang, Ira N., 2004. "The Influence of Others on Migration Plans," IZA Discussion Papers 1244, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Jan Fidrmuc & Peter Huber, 2007. "The willingness to migrate in the CEECs evidence from the Czech Republic," Empirica, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 351-369, September.
    6. Piracha, Matloob & Vadean, Florin, 2009. "Return Migration and Occupational Choice," IZA Discussion Papers 3922, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Christopher F Baum, 2006. "An Introduction to Modern Econometrics using Stata," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, number imeus, December.
    8. Lam, Kit-Chun, 2002. "Interaction between Economic and Political Factors in the Migration Decision," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 488-504, September.
    9. Thomas Liebig & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2004. "Migration, Self-Selection and Income Inequality: An International Analysis," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(1), pages 125-146, 02.
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