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Demand and supply effects of bargaining power shocks

Listed author(s):
  • Charpe, Matthieu
  • Kühn, Stefan

In times of crisis, social partners may consider a temporary decline in wages as a necessity to maintain employment. This paper studies the opposing demand and supply effects following declining bargaining power of workers in a New-Keynesian model with search and matching in the labour market. Lower labour income reduces aggregate demand in the presence of credit-constrained consumers. The main result is that falling bargaining power contracts output notably when monetary policy is constrained by the zero lower bound or when agents' expectations about the persistence of the shock adjust slowly.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S026499931500187X
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

Volume (Year): 51 (2015)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 21-32

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:51:y:2015:i:c:p:21-32
DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2015.07.004
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

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