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Tax evasion in a behaviorally heterogeneous society: An evolutionary analysis

Listed author(s):
  • Antoci, Angelo
  • Russu, Paolo
  • Zarri, Luca

We focus on the tax evasion dynamics emerging from repeated interaction of three types of taxpayers: cheaters, honest citizens and punishers. By assuming that cultural evolution is driven by material payoffs only, we show that a long overlooked behavioral attitude towards taxation such as tax morale is important to dynamically induce higher levels of tax compliance within a large-scale population. The results of our evolutionary analysis reveal that the presence of taxpayers who both act honestly in the first place and are willing to costly sanction cheaters plays an important role for the long-run success of the social battle against tax evasion.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264999314002235
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

Volume (Year): 42 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 106-115

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:42:y:2014:i:c:p:106-115
DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2014.06.002
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

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