IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Has the U.S. economy really become less correlated with that of the rest of the world?

  • Yoon, Gawon
Registered author(s):

    No abstract is available for this item.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VB1-4D10KS1-1/2/93210f5ad113667acee06bdd194130e4
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 147-158

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:22:y:2005:i:1:p:147-158
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Kristin Forbes & Roberto Rigobon, 1999. "No Contagion, Only Interdependence: Measuring Stock Market Co-movements," NBER Working Papers 7267, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Bollerslev, Tim & Engle, Robert F, 1993. "Common Persistence in Conditional Variances," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 167-86, January.
    3. Marcelle Chauvet & Simon Potter, 2001. "Recent changes in the U.S. business cycle," Staff Reports 126, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    4. Margaret McConnell & Gabriel Perez Quiros, 2000. "Output fluctuations in the United States: what has changed since the early 1980s?," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Mar.
    5. Jonathan Heathcote & Fabrizio Perri, 2002. "Financial Globalization and Real Regionalization," NBER Working Papers 9292, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. J. M. Marriott & J. C. Naylor & A. R. Tremayne, 2003. "Exploring economic time series: a Bayesian graphical approach," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 6(1), pages 124-145, 06.
    7. Granger, Clive W. J. & Swanson, Norman R., 1997. "An introduction to stochastic unit-root processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 35-62, September.
    8. Robin L. Lumsdaine & Eswar Prasad, 1999. "Identifying the Common Component in International Economic Fluctuations; A New Approach," IMF Working Papers 99/154, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Pericoli, Marcello & Sbracia, Massimo, 2005. "'Some contagion, some interdependence': More pitfalls in tests of financial contagion," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(8), pages 1177-1199, December.
    10. Chang-Jin Kim & Charles R. Nelson, 1999. "Has The U.S. Economy Become More Stable? A Bayesian Approach Based On A Markov-Switching Model Of The Business Cycle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 608-616, November.
    11. Leybourne, S J & McCabe, B P M & Tremayne, A R, 1996. "Can Economic Time Series Be Differenced to Stationarity?," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 14(4), pages 435-46, October.
    12. Robert Sollis & Paul Newbold & Stephen Leybourne, 2000. "Stochastic unit roots modelling of stock price indices," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 311-315.
    13. Taylor, A M Robert & van Dijk, Dick, 2002. " Can Tests for Stochastic Unit Roots Provide Useful Portmanteau Tests for Persistence?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 64(4), pages 381-97, September.
    14. C. W. Granger & E. Maasoumi & J. Racine, 2004. "A Dependence Metric for Possibly Nonlinear Processes," Journal of Time Series Analysis, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(5), pages 649-669, 09.
    15. Mardi Dungey & Diana Zhumabekova, 2001. "Testing for contagion using correlations: some words of caution," Pacific Basin Working Paper Series 2001-09, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    16. Ding, Zhuanxin & Granger, Clive W. J. & Engle, Robert F., 1993. "A long memory property of stock market returns and a new model," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 83-106, June.
    17. Michael F. Bleaney & Stephen J. Leybourne & Paul Mizen, 1999. "Mean Reversion of Real Exchange Rates in High-Inflation Countries," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 65(4), pages 839-854, April.
    18. Jonathan Heathcote & Fabrizio Perri, 2003. "Why Has the U.S. Economy Become Less Correlated with the Rest of the World?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 63-69, May.
    19. Yoon, Gawon, 2003. "A simple model that generates stylized facts of returns," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt0q3576s4, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:22:y:2005:i:1:p:147-158. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.