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Changes in Variability of the Business Cycle in the G7 Countries

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  • D van Dijk
  • D R Osborn
  • M Sensier

Abstract

Volatility breaks are tested and documented for 19 important monthly macroeconomic time series across the G7 countries. Across all conditional mean specifications considered, including both linear and nonlinear models with and without a structural break, volatility breaks are found to be widespread. This continues to hold when business cycle nonlinearities are allowed in the variance. Multiple volatility breaks are also examined, and these are found to be especially prevalent for short-term interest rates. Volatility breaks in industrial production and consumer prices are largely synchronous across the G7. The facts established are discussed in the context of some explanations put forward in the literature to explain volatility breaks previously found for US series.

Suggested Citation

  • D van Dijk & D R Osborn & M Sensier, 2002. "Changes in Variability of the Business Cycle in the G7 Countries," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 16, Economics, The University of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:16
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    Cited by:

    1. Brian M. Doyle & Jon Faust, 2005. "Breaks in the Variability and Comovement of G-7 Economic Growth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(4), pages 721-740, November.
    2. Erdenebat Bataa & Denise R. Osborn & Marianne Sensier & Dick van Dijk, 2009. "Changes in International Business Cycle Affiliations," Economics Discussion Paper Series 0924, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    3. Giuseppe Cavaliere & Peter C. B. Phillips & Stephan Smeekes & A. M. Robert Taylor, 2015. "Lag Length Selection for Unit Root Tests in the Presence of Nonstationary Volatility," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(4), pages 512-536, April.
    4. Niels Haldrup & Robinson Kruse & Timo Teräsvirta & Rasmus T. Varneskov, 2013. "Unit roots, non-linearities and structural breaks," Chapters, in: Nigar Hashimzade & Michael A. Thornton (ed.), Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Empirical Macroeconomics, chapter 4, pages 61-94, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Peter M. Summers, 2005. "What caused the Great Moderation? : some cross-country evidence," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 90(Q III), pages 5-32.
    6. Xu, Ke-Li & Phillips, Peter C.B., 2008. "Adaptive estimation of autoregressive models with time-varying variances," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(1), pages 265-280, January.
    7. Dong Jin Lee, 2021. "Bootstrap tests for structural breaks when the regressors and the serially correlated error term are unstable," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(2), pages 212-229, April.
    8. Pedro Perez & Denise Osborn & Marianne Sensier, 2007. "Business cycle affiliations in the context of European integration," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(2), pages 199-214.
    9. Cavaliere, Giuseppe & Rahbek, Anders & Taylor, A.M. Robert, 2010. "Testing for co-integration in vector autoregressions with non-stationary volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 158(1), pages 7-24, September.
    10. William Martin & Robert Rowthorn, 2004. "Will Stability Last?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1324, CESifo.
    11. Ossama Mikhail, 2004. "No More Rocking Horses: Trading Business-Cycle Depth for Duration Using an Economy-Specific Characteristic," Macroeconomics 0402026, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Ossama Mikhail, 2006. "Trading Business-Cycle Depth for Duration using an economy-specific characteristic," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 5(7), pages 1-12.
    13. Chauvet, Marcelle & Potter, Simon, 2013. "Forecasting Output," Handbook of Economic Forecasting, in: G. Elliott & C. Granger & A. Timmermann (ed.), Handbook of Economic Forecasting, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 0, pages 141-194, Elsevier.
    14. Hao Jin & Si Zhang & Jinsuo Zhang, 2017. "Spurious regression due to neglected of non-stationary volatility," Computational Statistics, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 1065-1081, September.
    15. Cavaliere, Giuseppe & Taylor, A.M. Robert, 2007. "Testing for unit roots in time series models with non-stationary volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(2), pages 919-947, October.

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