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Setting the scene: The mix of family policy objectives and packages across the OECD

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  • Adema, Willem

Abstract

Although changing in shape and form, families remain the cornerstone of society. Across the OECD Public policy supports families, but across countries the balance of underlying policy objectives can be different. For example, in some countries, family policy is largely driven by concerns about persistently low birth-rates while in others such concerns are not considered to be within the public domain. Across the OECD policymakers are concerned about child well-being and child development, but the intensity with which policy is driven by gender equity concerns varies considerably.

Suggested Citation

  • Adema, Willem, 2012. "Setting the scene: The mix of family policy objectives and packages across the OECD," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 487-498.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:34:y:2012:i:3:p:487-498
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2011.10.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Volker Ziemann, 2015. "Towards more gender equality in Austria," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1273, OECD Publishing.
    2. Franziska Gassmann & Daphne Francois & Lorena Zardo Trindade, 2015. "Improving Labor Market Outcomes for Poor and Vulnerable Groups in Mongolia," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23671, The World Bank.
    3. Garfinkel, Irwin & Zilanawala, Afshin, 2015. "Fragile families in the American welfare state," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 210-221.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Family policy; Female labour supply; Fertility; Child care; Public social spending and family benefits;

    JEL classification:

    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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