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Does the Village Fund matter in Thailand? Evaluating the impact on incomes and spending

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  • Boonperm, Jirawan
  • Haughton, Jonathan
  • Khandker, Shahidur R.

Abstract

Launched in 2001, the Thailand Village and Urban Community Fund (VF) provided almost US$2billion – a million baht for each of Thailand's 78,000 villages and wards – to provide working capital for locally-run rotating credit associations. Using data from the Thailand Socioeconomic Surveys of 2002 and 2004, we find that VF borrowers were disproportionately poor and agricultural. A fixed effects model using a panel of rural households for these years finds that VF borrowing is associated with, on average, 3.5% more current spending, and 1.4% more income; very similar impacts are found using a propensity score matching model applied to nationwide data in 2004, which also found that VF loans are associated with the acquisition of more durable goods. By way of contrast, borrowing from the Bank for Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives appears to have a stronger effect on income than on expenditures. The evidence also shows that the effect on expenditure (or income) of VF borrowing is strongest at the lower quantiles, and flowed disproportionately to low-income households; in both of these senses it is “pro-poor”.

Suggested Citation

  • Boonperm, Jirawan & Haughton, Jonathan & Khandker, Shahidur R., 2013. "Does the Village Fund matter in Thailand? Evaluating the impact on incomes and spending," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 3-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:25:y:2013:i:c:p:3-16
    DOI: 10.1016/j.asieco.2013.01.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Menkhoff, Lukas & Rungruxsirivorn, Ornsiri, 2011. "Do Village Funds Improve Access to Finance? Evidence from Thailand," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 110-122, January.
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    8. Coleman, Brett E., 1999. "The impact of group lending in Northeast Thailand," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 105-141, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Diego A. Vera-Cossio, 2017. "Targeting credit through community members," Development Research Working Paper Series 07/2017, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
    2. Islam, Asadul, 2015. "Heterogeneous effects of microcredit: Evidence from large-scale programs in Bangladesh," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 48-58.
    3. Amendola,Alessandra & Boccia,Marinella & Mele,Gianluca & Sensini,Luca, 2016. "Financial access and household welfare : evidence from Mauritania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7533, The World Bank.
    4. Haughton, Jonathon & Khandker, Shahidur R., 2016. "Microcredit in Viet Nam: Does it matter?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1569, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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