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The importance of structure in linking games

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  • Just, Richard E.
  • Netanyahu, Sinaia

Abstract

A common approach in modeling negotiations is to apply game theory to single issues. Recent work has suggested that the complexity of international negotiations can be better modeled by linking independent games. Successful linking is possible when the linked issues have compensating asymmetry of similar magnitude. An important result of linked games is that such games produce a greater feasible set of choices relative to the aggregated isolated games. In this paper, we demonstrate that achieving strict dominance of the linked game is not trivial and that results and implications depend on the structures of the isolated games. © 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
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Suggested Citation

  • Just, Richard E. & Netanyahu, Sinaia, 2000. "The importance of structure in linking games," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 24(1), pages 87-100, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agecon:v:24:y:2000:i:1:p:87-100
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Grant Hauer & C. Ford Runge, 1999. "Trade-Environment Linkages in the Resolution of Transboundary Externalities," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 25-39, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlo Carraro & Carmen Marchiori & Alessandra Sgobbi, 2005. "Applications of Negotiation Theory to Water Issues," Working Papers 2005.65, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    2. Bhaduri, Anik & Perez, Nicostrato D. & Liebe, Jens, 2008. "Scope and Sustainability of Cooperation in Transboundary Water Sharing of the Volta River," Discussion Papers 43324, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    3. Kimmich, Christian & Sagebiel, Julian, 2016. "Empowering irrigation: A game-theoretic approach to electricity utilization in Indian agriculture," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(PB), pages 174-185.
    4. Erik Ansink & Arjan Ruijs, 2008. "Climate Change and the Stability of Water Allocation Agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 41(2), pages 249-266, October.
    5. Pierre von Mouche & Henk Folmer, 2007. "Linking of Repeated Games. When Does It Lead to More Cooperation and Pareto Improvements?," Working Papers 2007.60, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    6. Pham Do, Kim Hang & Dinar, Ariel & McKinney, Daene, 2011. "Can issue linkage help mitigate externalities and enhance cooperation," MPRA Paper 37408, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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