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Can E-Payment Systems Revolutionize Finance of the Less Developed Countries? The Case of Mobile Payment Technology


  • Helmi Hamdi

    (Central Bank of Bahrain, Bahrain)


Technological progress in mobile industry makes mobile phones the most adopted technology of the last decade by the rich as well as poor. Mobile phones were at first intended for voice communication; nowadays they are used for sending and receiving information and they provide many advanced services to their users. Recent generation of mobile phones allows consumers to carry out transactions in the real and the virtual world by the use of mobile devices through mobile network. It is done by using mobile device such as Cell phone or PDA which is connected to payment access using mobile operator network. The aim of this paper is to analyze the technological evolution of mobile phones and to identify the macroeconomic consequences of their introduction into the financial sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Helmi Hamdi, 2011. "Can E-Payment Systems Revolutionize Finance of the Less Developed Countries? The Case of Mobile Payment Technology," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 1(2), pages 46-53, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eco:journ1:2011-02-3

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
    2. Levine, Ross & Zervos, Sara, 1998. "Stock Markets, Banks, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 537-558, June.
    3. Sylviane Guillaumont Jeanneney & Kangni Kpodar, 2011. "Financial Development and Poverty Reduction: Can There be a Benefit without a Cost?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 143-163.
    4. King, Robert G. & Levine, Ross, 1993. "Finance, entrepreneurship and growth: Theory and evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 513-542, December.
    5. Rajan, Raghuram G & Zingales, Luigi, 1998. "Financial Dependence and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 559-586, June.
    6. Helmi Hamdi, 2007. "Some Ambiguities Concerning the Development of Electronic Money," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 31(3), pages 293-307.
    7. Patrick T. Harker & Stavros A. Zenios, 1998. "What Drives the Performance of Financial Institutions?," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 98-21, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
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    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad Ali Nasir & Junjie Wu & Milton Yago & Haohong Li, 2015. "Influence of Psychographics and Risk Perception on Internet Banking Adoption: Current State of Affairs in Britain," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(2), pages 461-468.

    More about this item


    e-payment system; mobile payments; financial exclusion; economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes


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