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Does women's political empowerment promote public health expenditure in Africa?

Author

Listed:
  • Sosson Tadadjeu

    (The Dschang School of Economics and Management, University of Dschang, , Cameroon)

  • Alim Belek

    (Higher Teacher Training College (HTTTC), University of Bamenda, , Cameroon)

  • Henri Njangang

    (LAREFA, Faculty of Economics and Management, University of Dschang, Cameroon)

  • Marie-Laure Belomo

    (The Dschang School of Economics and Management, University of Dschang, , Cameroon)

  • Brice Kamguia

    (The Dschang School of Economics and Management, University of Dschang, , Cameroon)

Abstract

This paper analyses the effect of women's political empowerment on public health expenditure in a sample of 48 African countries over the period 2000-2017. Using The Ordinary Least Squares (OLS), the two-step system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM), and the Sequential Linear Panel Dynamic Model (SELPDM), the results provide strong evidence of a positive effect of women's political empowerment on public health expenditure in Africa. This result is robust to additional control variables, to alternative measures of women's political empowerment, to alternative measure of health expenditure, to outliers, and to alternative data structure. Based on these findings, we encourage efforts to promote the African women's political empowerment and suggest an increase in the number of seats held by women in parliaments.

Suggested Citation

  • Sosson Tadadjeu & Alim Belek & Henri Njangang & Marie-Laure Belomo & Brice Kamguia, 2021. "Does women's political empowerment promote public health expenditure in Africa?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 41(3), pages 1959-1969.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-21-00385
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tii N. Nchofoung & Simplice A. Asongu & Vanessa S. Tchamyou, 2024. "Effect of women’s political inclusion on the level of infrastructures in Africa," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 58(2), pages 1181-1202, April.
    2. Tii N. Nchofoung & Simplice A. Asongu & Vanessa S. Tchamyou, 2021. "The political implication of women and industrialisation in Africa," Research Africa Network Working Papers 21/072, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    3. Nchofoung, Tii & Asongu, Simplice & Tchamyou, Vanessa & Edoh, Ofeh, 2021. "Political inclusion and democracy in Africa: some empirical evidence," MPRA Paper 111838, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Tii N. Nchofoung & Simplice A. Asongu & Vanessa S. Tchamyou, 2022. "Effect of women’s political inclusion on the level of infrastructures in Africa," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 22/021, African Governance and Development Institute..
    5. Tii N. Nchofoung & Simplice A. Asongu & Vanessa S. Tchamyou & Ofeh M. Edoh, 2022. "Gender political inclusion and democracy in Africa: some empirical evidence," Working Papers of The Association for Promoting Women in Research and Development in Africa (ASPROWORDA). 22/011, The Association for Promoting Women in Research and Development in Africa (ASPROWORDA).
    6. Simplice A. Asongu & Cheikh T. Ndour & Judith C. M. Ngoungou, 2023. "The effects of gender political inclusion and democracy on environmental performance: evidence from the method of moments by quantile regression," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 23/060, African Governance and Development Institute..

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Women's political empowerment; public health expenditure; Panel data; Africa;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies

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