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Does education really matter for environmental quality?


  • Romuald S Kinda

    () (CERDI-CNRS / Universite d''Auvergne)


This paper investigates the impact of education on the growth of carbon dioxide emissions per capita over the period 1970-2004 in 85 countries. Using panel data and applying GMM-System estimations, our results suggest that education has no impact on the growth of air pollution for the whole sample. Nonetheless, this effect is sensitive to the sampling of countries according to their level of development. Indeed, while the effect remains insignificant in the developing countries sub-sample, education does matter for air pollution growth in the developed countries. More interestingly, when controlling for the quality of political institutions, the positive effect of education on air pollution growth is mitigated in the developed countries while being insignificant in the developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Romuald S Kinda, 2010. "Does education really matter for environmental quality?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(4), pages 2612-2626.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00305

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    2. Thomas Princen, 2001. "Consumption and its Externalities: Where Economy Meets Ecology," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 1(3), pages 11-30, August.
    3. Farzin, Y. Hossein & Bond, Craig A., 2006. "Democracy and environmental quality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 213-235, October.
    4. Bimonte, Salvatore, 2002. "Information access, income distribution, and the Environmental Kuznets Curve," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 145-156, April.
    5. Joakim Westerlund & Syed Basher, 2008. "Testing for Convergence in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Using a Century of Panel Data," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 40(1), pages 109-120, May.
    6. Xu, Bin, 2000. "Multinational enterprises, technology diffusion, and host country productivity growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 477-493, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Beate Jochimsen & Christian Raffer, 2016. "Herausforderungen bei der Messung von Wohlfahrt," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1595, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Somlanare Romuald KINDA & Pascale COMBES MOTEL & Jean-Louis COMBES, 2014. "Do Environmental Policies Hurt Trade Performance?," Working Papers 201404, CERDI.

    More about this item


    Carbon dioxide Per Capita; Education; GMM-system;

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education


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