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Performing Economics: A Critique of 'Teaching and Learning'

Author

Listed:
  • David Wilson

    () (London Metropolitan University)

  • William Dixon

    (London Metropolitan University)

Abstract

Economics students find difficulty in developing effective learning strategies; they would also welcome and benefit from a more pluralistic teaching of economics. Nevertheless, economics teaching has become less pluralistic over the recent past. Recent benchmark statements seem content to underwrite an essentially monist approach to the discipline in the hope that a deepening crisis in economics teaching can be averted by expanding teaching and learning programmes taking the content of teaching as given and instead concentrating on presentational reform. The paper argues that such teaching and learning strategies are part of the problem rather than its solution.

Suggested Citation

  • David Wilson & William Dixon, 2009. "Performing Economics: A Critique of 'Teaching and Learning'," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 91-105.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:8:y:2009:i:2:p:91-105
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    File URL: http://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree/v8n2/wilson.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Donald MacKenzie, 2006. "An Engine, Not a Camera: How Financial Models Shape Markets," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262134608, January.
    2. David Colander, 2004. "The Art of Teaching Economics," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 3(1), pages 63-76.
    3. Dixon, William, 2008. "Ricardo: Economic Thought And Social Order," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(02), pages 235-253, June.
    4. William E. Becker, 2004. "Economics for a Higher Education," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 3(1), pages 52-62.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andy Denis, 2013. "Pluralism in economics education," Chapters,in: Teaching Post Keynesian Economics, chapter 5, pages 88-105 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Seyyed Ali Zeytoon Nejad MOOSAVIAN, 2016. "Teaching Economics and Providing Visual “Big Pictures”," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 119-133, March.

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