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The Art of Teaching Economics

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  • David Colander

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Abstract

This paper considers the teaching of economics and argues that content, not form is what is central to economics teaching. It considers the "new paradigm of teaching" and suggests that while there is much good in that new paradigm, it is dominated by a "common sense approach" to teaching that combines content and delivery issues, and is midway between the old paradigm of teaching and the new paradigm.
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Suggested Citation

  • David Colander, 2003. "The Art of Teaching Economics," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0310, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mdl:mdlpap:0310
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    File URL: http://www.middlebury.edu/services/econ/repec/mdl/ancoec/0310.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Colander, 2003. "Muddling through and policy analysis," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 197-215.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Dalziel, 2011. "Schumpeter's 'Vision' and the Teaching of Principles of Economics to Resource Students," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 10(2), pages 63-74.
    2. David Colander, 2004. "What We Teach and What We Do," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0426, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    3. Dr. Mohammad Alauddin & Professor John Foster, 2005. "Heterogenous clientele and product differentiation: teaching economics in a changing environment," Discussion Papers Series 340, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    4. Mohammad Alauddin & Adrian Ashman, 2014. "The changing academic environment and diversity in students study philosophy, beliefs and attitudes in higher education," Discussion Papers Series 511, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    5. Pedro de Araujo & Roisin O’Sullivan & Nicole B. Simpson, 2013. "What Should be Taught in Intermediate Macroeconomics?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 74-90.
    6. Mohammad Alauddin & Temesgen Kifle, 2014. "Does the student evaluation of teaching instrument really measure instructorsù teaching effectiveness? An econometric analysis of studentsù perceptions in economics courses," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 156-168.
    7. David Wilson & William Dixon, 2009. "Performing Economics: A Critique of 'Teaching and Learning'," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 91-105.
    8. David Kauper, 2012. "Teaching Profit Seeking as the Source of Growth," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 11(2), pages 64-80.
    9. Dr. Mohammad Alauddin & Professor John Foster, 2005. "Teaching Economics at the University Level: Dynamics of Parameters and Implications," Discussion Papers Series 339, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    10. Omer GOKCEKUS & Kevin BENGYAK, 2015. "Learning Heckscher-Ohlin Model in Five Easy Steps," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 137-143, March.
    11. Helmy, Heba E., 2016. "A lottery on the first day of classes! An innovative structured steps assignment on a partially randomly selected topic," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 41-47.

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