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Post Walrasian Macro Policy and the Economics of Muddling Through

In: How Economics Should Be Done

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  • David Colander

Abstract

David Colander has been writing about economic methodology for over 30 years, but he goes out of his way to emphasize that he does not see himself as a methodologist. His pragmatic methodology is applicable to what economists are doing and attempts to answer questions that all economists face as they go about their work. The articles collected in this volume are divided, with the first part providing a framework underlying Colander’s methodology and introducing Colander’s methodology for economic policy within that framework. Part two presents Colander’s view on the methodology for microeconomics, while part three looks at Colander’s methodology for macroeconomics. The book closes with discussions of broader issues.

Suggested Citation

  • David Colander, 2018. "Post Walrasian Macro Policy and the Economics of Muddling Through," Chapters, in: How Economics Should Be Done, chapter 11, pages 144-162, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:17588_11
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chari, V.V. & Kehoe, Patrick J., 1999. "Optimal fiscal and monetary policy," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 26, pages 1671-1745, Elsevier.
    2. David Colander, 2003. "Muddling through and policy analysis," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 197-215.
    3. David Colander, 2018. "The Death Of Neoclassical Economics," Chapters, in: How Economics Should Be Done, chapter 5, pages 46-62, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. David Colander, 1999. "A Post-Walrasian Explanation of Wage and Price Inflexibility and a Keynesian Unemployment Equilibrium System," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Mark Setterfield (ed.), Growth, Employment and Inflation, chapter 15, pages 211-225, Palgrave Macmillan.
    5. Joseph E. Stiglitz, 1993. "Post Walrasian and Post Marxian Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 109-114, Winter.
    6. Bowles,Samuel & Gintis,Herbert & Gustafsson,Bo (ed.), 1993. "Markets and Democracy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521432238, December.
    7. Mark Setterfield (ed.), 1999. "Growth, Employment and Inflation," Palgrave Macmillan Books, Palgrave Macmillan, number 978-1-349-27393-5, Januario-.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bill Gibson, 2007. "A Multi-Agent Systems Approach to Microeconomic Foundations of Macro," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2007-10, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    2. Christopher A. Hartwell, 2017. "Understanding “Development”: Insights from Some Aspects of Complexity Theory," Homo Oeconomicus: Journal of Behavioral and Institutional Economics, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 165-190, November.
    3. Peter Hans Matthews, 2004. "Who is Post-Walrasian Man?," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0412, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    4. Bill Gibson, 2008. "The Current Macroeconomic Crisis," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2008-02, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.

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