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Economics for a Higher Education

Author

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  • William E. Becker

    () (Indiana University)

Abstract

The author addresses what is versus what should be taught in economics at the tertiary level and the way economics is taught versus how it should be taught. He argues that we need to assist students in recognizing the shortcomings of simplistic analyses of old before students rightly dismiss them as irrelevant and then wrongly dismiss all of economics as extraneous to modern day life. We need to bring the innovations in the science of economics into our teaching of economics. Similarly, we need to move beyond the outdated chalk and talk lecture methods to the active learning techniques made available by experimental economics, games and simulations, and the internet.

Suggested Citation

  • William E. Becker, 2004. "Economics for a Higher Education," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 3(1), pages 52-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:3:y:2004:i:1:p:52-62
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    File URL: https://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree/i3/becker.htm
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    Cited by:

    1. Ming Fai Pang & Cedric Linder & Duncan Fraser, 2006. "Beyond Lesson Studies and Design Experiments: Using theoretical tools in practice and finding out how they work," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 5(1), pages 28-45.
    2. Dr. Mohammad Alauddin & Professor John Foster, 2005. "Teaching Economics at the University Level: Dynamics of Parameters and Implications," Discussion Papers Series 339, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    3. Franklin G. Mixon & Richard J. Cebula (ed.), 2014. "New Developments in Economic Education," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15538.
    4. KimMarie McGoldrick & Robert Garnett, 2013. "Big Think: A Model for Critical Inquiry in Economics Courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(4), pages 389-398, October.
    5. Martin Kniepert, 2016. "What to teach, when teaching economics as a minor subject?," Working Papers 632016, Institute for Sustainable Economic Development, Department of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna.
    6. Elsa Galarza Contreras & Marianne Johnson, 2007. "Internationalising Intermediate Microeconomics: Collaborative Case Studies and Web-Based Learning," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 6(1), pages 9-26.
    7. Norton Grubb, W., 1995. "Postsecondary education and the sub-baccalaureate labor market: Corrections and extensions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 285-299, September.
    8. Alauddin, Mohammad & Ashman, Adrian & Nghiem, Son & Lovell, Knox, 2016. "What determines students’ study practices in higher education? An instrumental variable approach," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 46-54.
    9. Becker, William E., 2004. "Good-byE old, hello new in teaching economics," Australasian Journal of Economics Education (AJEE), University of Queensland, School of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 5-17, March.
    10. Wayne Geerling, 2011. "Using Multimedia to Teach Economics," Working Papers 2011.02, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    11. William E. Becker, 2007. "Quit Lying and Address the Controversies: There are No Dogmata, Laws, Rules or Standards in the Science of Economics," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 51(1), pages 3-14, March.
    12. David Wilson & William Dixon, 2009. "Performing Economics: A Critique of 'Teaching and Learning'," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 91-105.
    13. James K. Self & William E. Becker, 2016. "Teaching and Learning Alternatives to a Comparative Advantage Motivation for Trade," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 61(2), pages 178-190, October.
    14. Wayne Geerling, 2011. "Evaluating Robert Frank’s ‘Economic Naturalist’ Writing Assignment," Working Papers 2011.03, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    15. William E. Becker & Suzanne R. Becker, 2011. "Potpourri: Reflections from Husband/Wife Academic Editors," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 56(2), pages 74-84, November.
    16. Josephson, Anna & DeBoer, Lawrence & Nelson, David & Zissimopoulos, Angelika, 2016. "Reshaped for Higher Order Learning: Student Outcomes in the Redesign of an Undergraduate Macroeconomics Course," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235765, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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