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Die Bedeutung von Religion für die Bildung: Eine wirtschaftshistorische Forschungsagenda anhand preußischer Kreisdaten, Teil 1

  • Ludger Wößmann

    ()

Im 19. Jahrhundert nahm Deutschland und insbesondere Preußen eine international führende Stellung in der Entwicklung seines Bildungssystems ein. Wenngleich diese Rolle deskriptiv gut dokumentiert ist, konnten ihre Ursachen sowie ihre Bedeutung für den wirtschaftlichen Entwicklungsprozess bisher mit quantitativen Methoden kaum erforscht werden. Kürzlich wurden aber umfangreiche Datenbestände der preußischen Kreise und Städte, die fast das gesamte 19. Jahrhundert umspannen, für die mikroökonometrische Forschung zugänglich gemacht. Damit ist es möglich, die Bedeutung von Religion, Bildung und weiteren Faktoren für die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung im Preußen des 19. Jahrhunderts mit mikroregionalen Daten zu untersuchen. Dies wird derzeit in Forschungsprojekten des Bereichs Humankapital und Innovation am ifo Institut verfolgt. Der vorliegende Beitrag berichtet über Grundlagen und erste Ergebnisse der wirtschaftshistorischen Projektbestandteile, die sich mit der Bedeutung von Religion für die Bildung beschäftigen. In einem zweiten Teil wird in der übernächsten Ausgabe des ifo Schnelldienst die Bedeutung von Bildung für die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung untersucht werden.

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Article provided by Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich in its journal ifo Schnelldienst.

Volume (Year): 63 (2010)
Issue (Month): 23 (December)
Pages: 25-32

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Handle: RePEc:ces:ifosdt:v:63:y:2010:i:23:p:25-32
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  1. Sascha O. Becker & Ludger Woessmann, 2011. "Knocking on Heaven's Door? Protestantism and Suicide," CESifo Working Paper Series 3499, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Becker, Sascha O. & Wößmann, Ludger, 2010. "The effect of Protestantism on education before the industrialization: Evidence from 1816 Prussia," Munich Reprints in Economics 20254, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  3. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2008. "The Role of Cognitive Skills in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(3), pages 607-68, September.
  4. Hanushek, Eric A. & Woessmann, Ludger, 2011. "The Economics of International Differences in Educational Achievement," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
  5. Sascha O. Becker & Erik Hornung & Ludger Woessmann, 2011. "Education and Catch-Up in the Industrial Revolution," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 92-126, July.
  6. Becker, Sascha O. & Woessmann, Ludger, 2008. "Luther and the Girls: Religious Denomination and the Female Education Gap in 19th Century Prussia," IZA Discussion Papers 3837, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521529167 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. McCleary, Rachel & Barro, Robert, 2003. "Religion and Economic Growth across Countries," Scholarly Articles 3708464, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  9. Maristella Botticini & Zvi Eckstein, 2007. "From Farmers to Merchants, Conversions and Diaspora: Human Capital and Jewish History," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(5), pages 885-926, 09.
  10. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer, 2001. "Das Human Kapital," CEPR Discussion Papers 2701, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  11. Timo Boppart & Josef Falkinger & Volker Grossmann & Ulrich Woitek & Gabriela Wüthrich, 2008. "Qualifying Religion: The Role of Plural Identities for Educational Production," IEW - Working Papers 360, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  12. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2004. "Das Human Kapital: A Theory of the Demise of the Class Structure," GE, Growth, Math methods 0410003, EconWPA.
  13. Sascha O. Becker & Ludger Woessmann, 2009. "Was Weber Wrong? A Human Capital Theory of Protestant Economic History," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 124(2), pages 531-596, May.
  14. Go, Sun & Lindert, Peter, 2010. "The Uneven Rise of American Public Schools to 1850," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 70(01), pages 1-26, March.
  15. Ludger Wößmann, 2009. "Bildungssystem, PISA-Leistungen und volkswirtschaftliches Wachstum," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 62(10), pages 23-28, 05.
  16. Acemoglu, Daron & Johnson, Simon & Robinson, James A., 2005. "Institutions as a Fundamental Cause of Long-Run Growth," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 6, pages 385-472 Elsevier.
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