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Chapter 3: Tuning Secondary Education

Listed author(s):
  • Torben M. Andersen
  • Giuseppe Bertola
  • John Driffill
  • Harold James
  • Hans-Werner Sinn
  • Jan-Egbert Sturm
  • Branko UroÅ¡evic

Education is one of the most controversial issues in Europe. Reforms can have major short-term budgetary effects and a strong influence on longer-term growth and inequality trends. This chapter reviews differences across Europe in the orientation of curricula, in school autonomy and private education, and in teacher management, with a special focus on the secondary education level. It interprets current reform tensions and asks whether and how country-level policy choices may benefit from supranational EU-level coordination.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/EEAG-2016-tuning-secondary-education.pdf
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Article provided by CESifo Group Munich in its journal EEAG Report on the European Economy.

Volume (Year): (2016)
Issue (Month): (February)
Pages: 70-84

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Handle: RePEc:ces:eeagre:v::y:2016:i::p:70-84
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  1. Giuseppe Bertola & Daniele Checchi, 2013. "Who Chooses Which Private Education? Theory and International Evidence," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 27(3), pages 249-271, September.
  2. Eric Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2012. "Do better schools lead to more growth? Cognitive skills, economic outcomes, and causation," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 267-321, December.
  3. Pekkarinen, Tuomas & Pekkala, Sari & Uusitalo, Roope, 2006. "Educational policy and intergenerational income mobility: evidence from the Finnish comprehensive school reform," Working Paper Series 2006:13, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  4. Hanushek, Eric A. & Woessmann, Ludger, 2011. "The Economics of International Differences in Educational Achievement," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
  5. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Wössmann, 2006. "Does Educational Tracking Affect Performance and Inequality? Differences- in-Differences Evidence Across Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(510), pages 63-76, 03.
  6. Regina Dionisius & Samuel Muehlemann & Harald Pfeifer & Günter Walden & Felix Wenzelmann & Stefan C. Wolter, 2009. "Costs and Benefits of Apprenticeship Training. A Comparison of Germany and Switzerland," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 55(1), pages 7-37.
  7. Fack, Gabrielle & Grenet, Julien, 2010. "When do better schools raise housing prices? Evidence from Paris public and private schools," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1-2), pages 59-77, February.
  8. Giorgio Brunello & Daniele Checchi, 2007. "Does school tracking affect equality of opportunity? New international evidence," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 22, pages 781-861, October.
  9. Kenn Ariga & Giorgio Brunello, 2007. "Does Secondary School Tracking Affect Performance? Evidence from IALS," KIER Working Papers 630, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  10. Giuseppe Bertola, 2015. "France’s Almost Public Private Schools," CESifo Working Paper Series 5690, CESifo Group Munich.
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