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International technology adoption, R&D, and productivity growth

Author

Listed:
  • Choi Seung Mo

    () (International Monetary Fund, 700 19th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20431, USA)

  • González Daniel Toro

    (Facultad de Economía y Negocios, Universidad Tecnológica de Bolívar Parque Industrial y Tecnológico Carlos Vélez Pombo, Km 1 Vía Turbaco. Cartagena de Indias, Colombia)

  • Gray Peter

    (School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University, PO Box 646210, Hulbert 101, Pullman, WA 99164-6210, USA)

Abstract

International knowledge diffusion is considered an important source of productivity growth. However, direct observations on such diffusion have not been available at the macro level. We analyze novel data on international technology trade. Our empirical analyses indicate a positive association between payments for international technology adoption and the growth of labor productivity. Those payments appear to be a stronger contributor than research and development (R&D) investments for a large group of economies. For economies with high productivity, technology adoption payments tend to be complementary to R&D investments.

Suggested Citation

  • Choi Seung Mo & González Daniel Toro & Gray Peter, 2013. "International technology adoption, R&D, and productivity growth," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-24, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:13:y:2013:i:1:p:24:n:1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Basant, Rakesh & Fikkert, Brian, 1996. "The Effects of R&D, Foreign Technology Purchase, and Domestic and International Spillovers on Productivity in Indian Firms," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(2), pages 187-199, May.
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    7. Huang, Can & Arundel, Anthony & Hollanders, Hugo, 2010. "How Firms Innovate: R&D, Non-R&D, and Technology Adoption," MERIT Working Papers 027, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
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    9. Katrak, Homi, 1997. "Developing countries' imports of technology, in-house technological capabilities and efforts: an analysis of the Indian experience," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 67-83, June.
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    11. Parente, Stephen L & Prescott, Edward C, 1994. "Barriers to Technology Adoption and Development," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(2), pages 298-321, April.
    12. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Curatola, Giuliano & Donadelli, Michael & Grüning, Patrick, 2017. "Technology trade with asymmetric tax regimes and heterogeneous labor markets: Implications for macro quantities and asset prices," SAFE Working Paper Series 163, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    2. Daniel Toro González, 2015. "[Reseña] Saturno devora a su hijo: La reaparición del capitalismo patrimonial," Revista Economía y Región, Universidad Tecnológica de Bolívar, vol. 9(2), pages 221-230, December.

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