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Bank capital and liquidity

Author

Listed:
  • Farag, Marc

    () (Bank of England)

  • Harland , Damian

    () (Bank of England)

  • Nixon, Dan

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

Bank capital, and a bank’s liquidity position, are concepts that are central to understanding what banks do, the risks they take and how best those risks should be mitigated. This article provides a primer on these concepts. It can be misleading to think of capital as ‘held’ or ‘set aside’ by banks; capital is not an asset. Rather, it is a form of funding — one that can absorb losses that could otherwise threaten a bank’s solvency. Meanwhile, liquidity problems arise due to interactions between funding and the asset side of the balance sheet — when a bank does not hold sufficient cash (or assets that can easily be converted into cash) to repay depositors and other creditors. The article also explains the role of prudential regulation of banks, which seeks to ensure that banks have sufficient capital and liquidity resources to properly account for the risks that they take.

Suggested Citation

  • Farag, Marc & Harland , Damian & Nixon, Dan, 2013. "Bank capital and liquidity," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(3), pages 201-215.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:qbullt:0110
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Xiong, Wanting & Wang, Yougui, 2017. "The impact of Basel III on money creation: A synthetic analysis," Economics Discussion Papers 2017-53, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. Arrowsmith, Martin & Griffiths, Martin & Franklin, Jeremy & Wohlmann, Evan & Young, Garry & Gregory, David, 2013. "SME forbearance and its implications for monetary and financial stability," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(4), pages 296-303.
    3. Balluck, Kushal, 2015. "Investment banking: linkages to the real economy and the financial system," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 55(1), pages 4-22.
    4. repec:fau:fauart:v:67:y:2017:i:4:p:318-341 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Dent, Kieran & Westwood, Ben & Segoviano, Miguel, 2016. "Stress testing of banks: an introduction," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 56(3), pages 130-143.
    6. McLeay, Michael & Radia, Amar & Thomas, Ryland, 2014. "Money creation in the modern economy," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(1), pages 14-27.
    7. Clemens Bonner & Iman Lelyveld & Robert Zymek, 2015. "Banks’ Liquidity Buffers and the Role of Liquidity Regulation," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 48(3), pages 215-234, December.
    8. Manning, Matthew, 2016. "Markets and operations: 2016 Q3," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 56(3), pages 146-154.
    9. Beau, Emily & Hill, John & Hussain, Tanveer & Nixon, Dan, 2014. "Bank funding costs: what are they, what determines them and why do they matter?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(4), pages 370-384.
    10. Tucker, Paul & Hall, Simon & Pattani, Aashish, 2013. "Macroprudential policy at the Bank of England," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(3), pages 192-200.
    11. Heidorn, Thomas & Buschmann, Christian, 2014. "The liquidity reserve funding and management strategies," Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series 210, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.
    12. M. Birn & M. Dietsch & D. Durant, 2017. "How to reach all Basel requirements at the same time?," Débats économiques et financiers 28, Banque de France.
    13. Davey, Nick & Gray, Daniel, 2014. "How has the Liquidity Saving Mechanism reduced banks’ intraday liquidity costs in CHAPS?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(2), pages 180-189.
    14. Harimohan, Rashmi & Nelson, Benjamin, 2014. "How might macroprudential capital policy affect credit conditions?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(3), pages 287-303.
    15. Bush, Oliver & Knott, Samuel & Peacock, Chris, 2014. "Why is the UK banking system so big and is that a problem?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(4), pages 385-395.
    16. Chowla, Shiv & Quaglietti, Lucia & Rachel, Lukasz, 2014. "How have world shocks affected the UK economy?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(2), pages 167-179.
    17. Shakir, Tamarah & Tong, Matthew, 2014. "The interaction of the FPC and the MPC," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(4), pages 396-408.
    18. Butt, Nick & Pugh, Alice, 2014. "Credit spreads: capturing credit conditions facing households and firms," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(2), pages 137-148.
    19. Liu, Zijun & Quiet, Stephanie & Roth , Benedict, 2015. "Banking sector interconnectedness: what is it, how can we measure it and why does it matter?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 55(2), pages 130-138.
    20. Alphandary, Alice, 2014. "Risk managing loan collateral at the Bank of England," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(2), pages 190-201.
    21. Button, Richard & Knott, Samual & Macmanus, Conor & Willison, Matthew, 2015. "Desperate adventurers and men of straw: the failure of City of Glasgow Bank and its enduring impact on the UK banking system," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 55(1), pages 23-35.
    22. Chennells, Lucy & Wingfield, Venetia, 2015. "Bank failure and bail-in: an introduction," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 55(3), pages 228-241.
    23. Gracie, Andrew & Chennells, Lucy & Menary, Mark, 2014. "The Bank of England’s approach to resolving failed institutions," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(4), pages 409-418.
    24. McLeay, Michael & Radia, Amar & Thomas, Ryland, 2014. "Money in the modern economy: an introduction," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(1), pages 4-13.
    25. Burrows, Oliver & Cumming, Fergus, 2015. "Mapping the UK financial system," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 55(2), pages 114-129.

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