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Unions And Employment Growth In British Workplaces During The 1990s: A Panel Analysis


  • Alex Bryson


This paper uses the 1990-1998 Workplace Industrial Relations Survey Panel to analyse the impact of unions on employment growth among private sector workplaces in Britain. The growth rate among unionised workplaces was roughly 3-4% per annum lower than among non-unionised workplaces, "ceteris paribus". The effect is not accounted for by the age of unionised workplaces, union concentration in declining industries, or organisational or technical change at workplace level. The effect remains once we account for the impact of unions on workplace survival. However, effects are only apparent where unions do not negotiate over employment and where unions have some degree of bargaining strength. Copyright (c) Scottish Economic Society 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Bryson, 2004. "Unions And Employment Growth In British Workplaces During The 1990s: A Panel Analysis," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 51(4), pages 477-506, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:51:y:2004:i:4:p:477-506

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Centeno, Mario & Mello, Antonio S., 1999. "How integrated are the money market and the bank loans market within the European Union?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 75-106, January.
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    10. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alex Bryson & Michael White, 2016. "Unions and the economic basis of attitudes," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(4), pages 360-378, July.
    2. David Blanchflower & Alex Bryson, 2004. "The Union Wage Premium in the US and the UK," CEP Discussion Papers dp0612, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Brändle Tobias & Heinbach Wolf Dieter, 2013. "Opening Clauses in Collective Bargaining Agreements: More Flexibility to Save Jobs?," Review of Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 64(2), pages 159-192, August.
    4. Semih Akcomak & Suzanne Kok & Hugo Rojas-Romagosa, 2013. "The effects of technology and offshoring on changes in employment and task-content of occupations," CPB Discussion Paper 233, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    5. Tobias Brändle & Laszlo Goerke, 2015. "The One Constant: A Causal Effect of Collective Bargaining on Employment Growth? Evidence from German Linked-Employer-Employee Data," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201501, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    6. Alex Bryson & John Forth, 2016. "What Role Did Management Practices Play in SME Growth Post-recession?," DoQSS Working Papers 16-11, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    7. Blanchflower, David G., 2006. "A Cross-Country Study of Union Membership," IZA Discussion Papers 2016, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Patrice Laroche & Géraldine Schmidt & Heidi Wechtler, 2006. "L'influence des relations sociales sur la performance des entreprises," Post-Print hal-01010597, HAL.

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