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Is Environmental Protection Beneficial for the Environment?

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  • Alberto Ansuategi
  • Simone Marsiglio

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  • Alberto Ansuategi & Simone Marsiglio, 2017. "Is Environmental Protection Beneficial for the Environment?," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(3), pages 786-802, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:3:p:786-802
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/rode.12267
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marsiglio, Simone, 2011. "On the relationship between population change and sustainable development," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 353-364, December.
    2. Xepapadeas, Anastasios, 1997. "Economic development and environmental pollution: traps and growth," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 327-350, August.
    3. Aude Pommeret & Fabien Prieur, 2013. "Double Irreversibility and Environmental Policy Timing," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 15(2), pages 273-291, April.
    4. Smulders, Sjak & Gradus, Raymond, 1996. "Pollution abatement and long-term growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 505-532, November.
    5. Chung-Huang Huang & Deqin Cai, 1994. "Constant-returns endogenous growth with pollution control," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 4(4), pages 383-400, August.
    6. Mouez Fodha, 2010. "Could environmental public policy be harmful for the environment?," Recherches économiques de Louvain, De Boeck Université, vol. 76(4), pages 371-390.
    7. Mouez Fodha & Thomas Seegmuller, 2014. "Environmental Quality, Public Debt and Economic Development," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 57(4), pages 487-504, April.
    8. Cees Withagen, 1995. "Pollution, abatement and balanced growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 5(1), pages 1-8, January.
    9. Pearce, David W, 1991. "The Role of Carbon Taxes in Adjusting to Global Warming," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(407), pages 938-948, July.
    10. Sjak Smulders, "undated". "Environmental Policy and Sustainable Economic Growth - an endogenous growth perspective," EPRU Working Paper Series 95-07, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    11. Carl Pasurka, 2008. "Perspectives on Pollution Abatement and Competitiveness: Theory, Data, and Analyses," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 2(2), pages 194-218, Summer.
    12. Ricci, Francesco, 2007. "Channels of transmission of environmental policy to economic growth: A survey of the theory," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 688-699, February.
    13. Gene M. Grossman & Alan B. Krueger, 1995. "Economic Growth and the Environment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(2), pages 353-377.
    14. Mouez Fodha & Thomas Seegmuller, 2014. "Environmental Quality, Public Debt and Economic Development," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 57(4), pages 487-504, April.
    15. Rebelo, Sergio, 1991. "Long-Run Policy Analysis and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 500-521, June.
    16. C. Jaeger & Leonidas Paroussos & Diana Mangalagiu & Roland Kupers & Antoine Mandel & J. David Tabara, 2012. "A new growth path for Europe: generating prosperity and jobs in the low-carbon economy," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00666804, HAL.
    17. Raymond Gradus & Sjak Smulders, 1993. "The trade-off between environmental care and long-term growth—Pollution in three prototype growth models," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 25-51, February.
    18. Kelly, David L., 2003. "On environmental Kuznets curves arising from stock externalities," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 1367-1390, June.
    19. Bartz, Sherry & Kelly, David L., 2008. "Economic growth and the environment: Theory and facts," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 115-149, May.
    20. Knut Rosendahl, 1997. "Does improved environmental policy enhance economic growth?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(3), pages 341-364, April.
    21. Frank Hettich, 1998. "Growth effects of a revenue-neutral environmental tax reform," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 67(3), pages 287-316, October.
    22. Philippe Michel & Gilles Rotillon, 1995. "Disutility of pollution and endogenous growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 6(3), pages 279-300, October.
    23. George Economides & Apostolis Philippopoulos, 2008. "Growth enhancing policy is the means to sustain the environment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(1), pages 207-219, January.
    24. Christian Leipert, 1989. "Social Costs of the Economic Process and National Accounts: The Example of Defensive Expenditures," Journal of Interdisciplinary Economics, , vol. 3(1), pages 27-46, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marsiglio, Simone & Privileggi, Fabio, 2018. "On the Economic Growth and Environmental Trade-Off: a Multi-Objective Analysis," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201813, University of Turin.
    2. Jingjing Liu & Jing Wang & Zehui Li & Yingkun Du, 0. "Exploring impacts of the Grain for Green program on Chinese economic growth," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-18.

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