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Retirement Choices in Italy: What an Option Value Model Tells Us

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  • Michele Belloni
  • Rob Alessie

Abstract

Using Italian data this study estimates the option value model in order to quantify the effect of financial incentives on retirement choices. As far as we know, this is the first empirical study which estimates the conditional multiple-years (CMY) model put forward by Stock and Wise (1990). This implies that we have accounted for dynamic self-selection bias. For the subsample of females the CMY model yields plausible estimates of the preference parameters such as the marginal utility of leisure. This last parameter is typically underestimated if one does not take into account the self-selection problem. From our results it becomes clear that dynamic self-selection results in a considerable downward-bias in the estimate of the marginal utility of leisure. We also performed a simulation study to gauge the effects of a dramatic pension reform. It turns out that the underestimation of the marginal utility of leisure translates into a sizable overprediction of the impact of the reform. For males we also obtain plausible estimates. The results for males should be interpreted with caution because we are not able to fully correct for dynamic self-selection bias.
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  • Michele Belloni & Rob Alessie, 2013. "Retirement Choices in Italy: What an Option Value Model Tells Us," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 75(4), pages 499-527, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:75:y:2013:i:4:p:499-527
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-0084.2012.00701.x
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    Cited by:

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    2. Santiago Pereda Fernández, 2016. "Copula-based random effects models for clustered data," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1092, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Li, Jinjing & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2011. "Retirement Choice Simulation in Household Settings with Heterogeneous Pension Plans," IZA Discussion Papers 5866, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Denis Fougère & Pierre Gouëdard, 2021. "The effects of financial incentives and disincentives on teachers' retirement decisions: Evidence from the 2003 French pension reform," Working Papers hal-03465859, HAL.
    5. Blundell, R. & French, E. & Tetlow, G., 2016. "Retirement Incentives and Labor Supply," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, in: Piggott, John & Woodland, Alan (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 457-566, Elsevier.
    6. Peri, Giovanni & Romiti, Agnese & Rossi, Mariacristina, 2015. "Immigrants, domestic labor and women's retirement decisions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 18-34.
    7. Agnese Romiti & Maria Cristina Rossi, 2011. "Should we Retire Earlier in order to Look After our Parents? The Role of immigrants," CeRP Working Papers 124, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
    8. Peri, Giovanni & Romiti, Agnese & Rossi, Mariacristina, 2013. "Immigrants, Household Production and Women's Retirement," IZA Discussion Papers 7549, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions

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