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The Economy‐Wide Effects of the BSE Crisis: A CGE Analysis

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  • Scott McDonald
  • Deborah Roberts

Abstract

A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model of the UK economy is used to investigate the economy‐wide effects of the BSE crisis. The impact of two alternative government strategies for dealing with the crisis, support buying and subsidy payments, are compared with the scenario of no government intervention. The results indicate that whilst the macroeconomic consequences of the crisis may be small in percentage terms, substitution and resource re‐allocation effects are substantial. In particular, the impact spreads far beyond those directly impacted by the shock with some sectors of the food industry benefiting. Moreover the alternative government strategies have very different macro economic and intersectoral effects. It is argued that the results support the further development of the model and underlying database.

Suggested Citation

  • Scott McDonald & Deborah Roberts, 1998. "The Economy‐Wide Effects of the BSE Crisis: A CGE Analysis," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 458-471, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:49:y:1998:i:3:p:458-471
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1477-9552.1998.tb01285.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1477-9552.1998.tb01285.x
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    1. Robinson, Sherman & Kilkenny, Maureen & Hanson, Kenneth, 1990. "The USDA/ERS Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Model of the United States," Staff Reports 278341, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Jean-Marc Burniaux & François Delorme & Ian Lienert & John P. Martin & Peter Hoeller, 1988. "Quantifying the Economy-Wide Effects of Agricultural Policies: A General Equilibrium Approach," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 55, OECD Publishing.
    3. Roberts, Deborah, 1995. "UK Agriculture in the Wider Economy: The Importance of Net SAM Linkage Effects," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 22(4), pages 495-511.
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    1. Pierre Boulanger & Hasan Dudu & Emanuele Ferrari & George Philippidis, 2016. "Russian Roulette at the Trade Table: A Specific Factors CGE Analysis of an Agri-food Import Ban," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(2), pages 272-291, June.
    2. Burrell, A., 2011. "Is it becoming more difficult to research EU agricultural sector policies?," Proceedings “Schriften der Gesellschaft für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften des Landbaues e.V.”, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA), vol. 46, March.
    3. Christine Wieck & David Holland, 2010. "The economic effect of the Canadian BSE outbreak on the US economy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(8), pages 935-946.
    4. Devadoss, Stephen & Holland, David W. & Stodick, Leroy & Ghosh, Joydeep, 2006. "A General Equilibrium Analysis of Foreign and Domestic Demand Shocks Arising from Mad Cow Disease in the United States," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 31(2), pages 1-13, August.
    5. Dimitrios Panagiotou & Azzeddine M. Azzam, 2010. "Trade Bans, Imperfect Competition, and Welfare: BSE and the U.S. Beef Industry," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 58(1), pages 109-129, March.
    6. Rocchi, Benedetto & Romano, Donato & Stefani, Gianluca, 2002. "Agriculture and Income Distribution: Insights from a SAM of the Italian Economy," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24919, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Lloyd, Tim A. & Morgan, C. Wyn & McCorriston, Steve & Rayner, Anthony J., 2003. "The Impact Of Food Scares On Price Transmission In Inter-Related Markets," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25904, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Nin Pratt, A. & Bonnet, P. & Jabbar, Mohammad A. & Ehui, Simeon K. & de Haan, C., 2005. "Benefits and cost of compliance of compliance of sanitary regulations in livestock markets: the case of Rift valley Fever in the Somali Region of Ethiopia," Research Reports 182867, International Livestock Research Institute.
    9. Verbeke, Wim & Ward, Ronald W., 2001. "A fresh meat almost ideal demand system incorporating negative TV press and advertising impact," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(2-3), pages 359-374, September.
    10. Burrell, Alison M., 2010. "Is it becoming more difficult to research EU agricultural sector policies?," 50th Annual Conference, Braunschweig, Germany, September 29-October 1, 2010 93946, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    11. L. J. Hubbard & G. Philippidis, 2001. "General Equilibrium and the Ban on British Beef Exports," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 87-95, September.

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