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Trade Liberalisation, Efficiency and South Africa's Sugar Industry

Author

Listed:
  • Scott McDonald

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

  • Cecilia Punt

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a computable general equilibrium (CGE) analysis of the South African sugar industry. The study was inspired by analyses of the EU South Africa Free Trade Agreement that indicated the importance of sugar exports to the welfare gains from agricultural trade liberalisation and by the increasing pressure upon OECD countries to reform their sugar (trade) policies. In addition to the effects of trade liberalisation this study also considers the implications of increases in the efficiency with which sugarcane is converted to raw sugar, which is an important determinant of the competitiveness of sugar production and exports. The results indicate that there would be substantial welfare gains across all household groups and that overall agricultural producers in South Africa should benefit; however there are substantial variations in the impact upon agricultural producers in different provinces, with farmers in some provinces facing reductions in the profitability of farming.

Suggested Citation

  • Scott McDonald & Cecilia Punt, 2004. "Trade Liberalisation, Efficiency and South Africa's Sugar Industry," Working Papers 2004012, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2004.
  • Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2004012
    as

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    File URL: http://www.shef.ac.uk/content/1/c6/03/91/71/SERP2004012.pdf
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    File URL: http://www.shef.ac.uk/content/1/c6/03/91/71/SERP2004012.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, 2004
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mitchell, Donald, 2004. "Sugar policies opportunity for change," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3222, The World Bank.
    2. John C. Beghin & Ataman Aksoy, 2003. "Agricultural Trade and the Doha Round: Lessons from Commodity Studies," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 03-bp42, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    3. Michael Matsebula, 2001. "Key Issues facing Sugar Industries in the Southern African Development Community," Working Papers 01050, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    4. Pyatt, Graham, 1988. "A SAM approach to modeling," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 327-352.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jo Lorentzen & Anton Cartwright & Charles Meth, 2010. "Trade Liberalization, Rural Poverty and the Environment: A Case Study of Sugarcane Production in the Incomati River Basin in Mpumalanga, South Africa," Chapters,in: Vulnerable Places, Vulnerable People, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. AfDB AfDB, 2008. "Working Paper 95 - Agricultural Trade Policy Reform in South Africa," Working Paper Series 2228, African Development Bank.
    3. AfDB AfDB, 2008. "Working Paper 95 - Agricultural Trade Policy Reform in South Africa," Working Paper Series 2308, African Development Bank.
    4. Margaret Chitiga & Tonia Kandiero & Phindile Ngwenya, 2008. "Working Paper 95 - Agricultural Trade Policy Reform in South Africa," Working Paper Series 230, African Development Bank.
    5. Chitiga, Margaret & Kandiero, Tonia & Ngwenya, P., 2008. "Agricultural trade policy reform in South Africa," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 0(Issue 1), pages 1-26, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sugar; South Africa; Computable General Equilibrium; Trade.;

    JEL classification:

    • N57 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Africa; Oceania
    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade

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