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Agricultural Trade and the Doha Round: Lessons from Commodity Studies

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  • John C. Beghin
  • Ataman Aksoy

Abstract

While global analytical approaches to agricultural trade liberalization yield large gains for most economies, there are substantial variations in the policy regimes across commodities. To clarify the multiplicity of distortions and impacts, the World Bank's Trade Department undertook a series of commodity studies. The studies highlight the important challenges faced by negotiating countries in the Doha Round of the World Trade Organization (WTO) trade negotiations. The studies provide a sharper look at the North-South dimensions of the agricultural trade debate, with the North's trade barriers, domestic support, and tariff escalation. They also underscore the South-South challenges on border protection and the reduced rural income opportunities for the lowest-income countries due to policies in higher-income countries that depress world prices. Agricultural trade liberalization would induce significant price increases for most commodities. The studies identify the detrimental effects of multilateral trade liberalization for some countries because of lost preferential trade agreements and higher prices on net consumers of commodities. Given the complexity of specific issues in agriculture, as well as the North-South and South-South dimensions of distortions, a global solution would be required to liberalize these markets. Rather than being self-contained, agricultural trade negotiations should involve concessions on other sectors and issues (services and intellectual property rights for example) to identify overall reform packages palatable to all parties.

Suggested Citation

  • John C. Beghin & Ataman Aksoy, 2003. "Agricultural Trade and the Doha Round: Lessons from Commodity Studies," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 03-bp42, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
  • Handle: RePEc:ias:fpaper:03-bp42
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bruce A. Babcock & John C. Beghin & Jacinto F. Fabiosa & Stephane De Cara & Amani Elobeid & Cheng Fang & Chad E. Hart & Murat Isik & Holger Matthey & Alexander E. Saak & Karen Kovarik & FAPRI Staff, 2002. "Doha Round of the World Trade Organization: Appraising Further Liberalization of Agricultural Markets, The," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 02-wp317, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    2. Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Beghin, John C. & DeCara, Stephane & Elobeid, Amani & Fang, Cheng & Isik, Murat & Matthey, Holger & Saak, Alexander, 2002. "Doha Round of the World Trade Organization and Agricultural Markets Liberalization: Impacts on Developing Economies, The," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10056, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Asafu-Adjaye & Renuka Mahadevan, 2009. "Regional Trade Agreements versus Global Trade Liberalisation: Implications for a Small Island Developing State," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 509-529, March.
    2. World Bank, 2009. "Land Reform, Rural Development, and Poverty in the Philippines : Revisiting the Agenda," World Bank Other Operational Studies 18545, The World Bank.
    3. Hoekman, Bernard & Michalopoulos, Constantine & Winters, L. alan, 2003. "More favorable and differential treatment of developing countries : toward a new approach in the World Trade Organization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3107, The World Bank.
    4. Scott McDonald & Cecilia Punt, 2004. "Trade Liberalisation, Efficiency and South Africa's Sugar Industry," Working Papers 2004012, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2004.
    5. Paul Schure & G. Cornelis van Kooten & Yichuan Wang, 2007. "Challenges for Less Developed Countries: Agricultural Policies in the EU and the US," Working Papers 2007-08, University of Victoria, Department of Economics, Resource Economics and Policy Analysis Research Group.
    6. Ernesto Zedillo & Patrick Messerlin & Julia Nielson, 2005. "Trade for Development. Achieving the Millennium Development Goals," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/8367, Sciences Po.
    7. Susanto, Dwi & Rosson, C. Parr, III & Adcock, Flynn J., 2006. "Trade Creation and Trade Diversion in the North American Free Trade Agreement: The Case of Agricultural Sector," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21357, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    8. H. Bruce Huff, 2010. "Making Doha More Developmentally Friendly for Agriculture," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 58(1), pages 23-35, March.
    9. Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Chakir, Raja & Gallezot, Jacques, 2006. "The Utilisation of EU and US Trade Preferences for Developing Countries in the Agri-Food Sector," Working Papers 18867, TRADEAG - Agricultural Trade Agreements.
    10. Malik, R. P. S., 2009. "Indian agriculture: recent performance and prospects in the wake of globalization," IWMI Books, Reports H042037, International Water Management Institute.
    11. Nyhodo, Bonani & Punt, Cecilia & Vink, Nick, 2009. "The potential impact of the Doha Development Agenda on the South African economy: liberalising OECD agriculture and food trade," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 48(1), March.
    12. Jean-Philippe Gervais & Bruno Larue & Harvey E. Lapan, 2008. "WTO Disciplines on Domestic Support and Market Access in Agri-Food Supply Chains," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 56(4), pages 429-444, December.
    13. World Bank, 2003. "Global Economic Prospects 2004 : Realizing the Development Promise of the Doha Agenda," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14782, April.
    14. Badri Narayanan, G. & Khorana, Sangeetha, 2014. "Tariff escalation, export shares and economy-wide welfare: A computable general equilibrium approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 109-118.
    15. Tom Achterbosch & Hakim Ben Hammouda & Patrick Osakwe & Frank van Tongeren, 2004. "Trade liberalisation under the Doha Development Agenda Options and consequences for Africa," International Trade 0407013, EconWPA.
    16. Aksoy, M. Ataman & Ng, Francis, 2010. "The evolution of agricultural trade flows," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5308, The World Bank.
    17. Khorana, Sangeeta, 2008. "The Developmental Relevance of Tariff Rate Quotas as a Market Access Instrument: An Analysis of Swiss Agricultural Imports," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 9(2).

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