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The evolution of agricultural trade flows

  • Aksoy, M. Ataman
  • Ng, Francis

Earlier research showed that during the 1980s and 1990s most of the global agricultural trade expansion took place among the industrial countries and among countries within trade blocs. These were also periods of declining agricultural prices. These prices increased during the 2000s, there were continuous trade reforms, and many developing countries started to support their agricultural sectors. This paper analyzes trade flows during the past two decades, and tries to measure whether all these developments have changed the trade balances and the share of different groups within the global trade flows. In addition, it looks at the trade balances on food to see the impact of these changes on net food importing countries. In conclusion, unlike the case with manufacturing, developing countries have not been able to increase their export shares in agriculture as significantly. They have maintained their trade shares by primarily expanding exports to other developing countries.

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Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 5308.

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Date of creation: 01 May 2010
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5308
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  1. Julio J. Nogues, 2005. "Comment on “Trade, Growth, and Poverty--A Selective Survey,” by Andrew Berg and Anne Krueger, and “Doha and the World Poverty Targets,” by L. Alan Winters," International Trade 0502007, EconWPA.
  2. Aksoy, M. Ataman & Beghin, John C., 2005. "Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries," Staff General Research Papers 12228, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. John C. Beghin & Ataman Aksoy, 2003. "Agricultural Trade and the Doha Round: Lessons from Commodity Studies," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 03-bp42, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
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