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Occupational Stereotypes and Gender-Specific Job Satisfaction

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  • Simon Janssen
  • Uschi Backes-Gellner

Abstract

type="main" xml:id="irel12126-abs-0001"> Using representative data containing information on job satisfaction and workers’ gender-specific prejudices, we investigate the relationship between stereotyping and job satisfaction. We show that women in stereotypically male jobs are significantly less satisfied with their work climate and job content than in stereotypically female jobs but more satisfied with their income in those same jobs. Our findings indicate that women trade off their higher income satisfaction against the negative consequences of stereotyping. As long as we take into account that stereotypically male jobs are physically more demanding than stereotypically female jobs, men are generally more satisfied with stereotypically male jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Janssen & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2016. "Occupational Stereotypes and Gender-Specific Job Satisfaction," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 71-91, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:indres:v:55:y:2016:i:1:p:71-91
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/irel.2016.55.issue-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Kuhn & Stefan C. Wolter, 2018. "The Strength of Gender Norms and Gender-Stereotypical Occupational Aspirations Among Adolescents," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0151, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    2. Benoît Rapoport & Claire Thibout, 2016. "Why Do Boys and Girls Make Different Educational Choices? The Influence of Expected Earnings and Test Scores," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Eriksson, Tor & Smith, Nina & Smith, Valdemar, 2017. "Gender Stereotyping and Self-Stereotyping Attitudes: A Large Field Study of Managers," IZA Discussion Papers 10932, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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