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Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? The Cross Border Impact of Casino Entrance

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  • Michael J. Hicks

Abstract

This study estimates the impact of casino entrance in adjacent counties on aggregate and selected subsector incomes on counties adjacent in Indiana from 1990 to 2008. Employing a spatial econometric model and an approach that combines pre-casino entrance forecasts and actual income changes, this study finds very modest increases in income growth in casino counties in the econometric model but adjacent county income declines which are economically irrelevant. The forecast approach mirrors, with less precision, this finding. These findings suggest that welfare effects of casinos are more geographically distributed than the literature has yet reported primarily because of the redistribution of retail trade.

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  • Michael J. Hicks, 2014. "Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? The Cross Border Impact of Casino Entrance," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 5-20, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:45:y:2014:i:1:p:5-20
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/grow.12031
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    1. Hamparsum Bozdogan, 1987. "Model selection and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC): The general theory and its analytical extensions," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 345-370, September.
    2. John Warren Kindt, 2001. "The costs of addicted gamblers: should the states initiate mega-lawsuits similar to the tobacco cases?," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1-3), pages 17-63.
    3. William R. Eadington, 1999. "The Economics of Casino Gambling," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 173-192, Summer.
    4. Michael J. Hicks, 2009. "Racino Gaming's Impact on Wages, Employment, Economic Diversity and Stability: Evidence from a Spatial Model of West Virginia," Journal of Economic Insight (formerly the Journal of Economics (MVEA)), Missouri Valley Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 21-34.
    5. Walker, Douglas M. & Jackson, John D., 1998. "New Goods and Economic Growth: Evidence from Legalized Gambling," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 28(2), pages 47-70, Fall.
    6. Ricardo C. Gazel & Dan S. Rickman & William N. Thompson, 2001. "Casino gambling and crime: a panel study of Wisconsin counties," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1-3), pages 65-75.
    7. Douglas M. Walker & John D. Jackson, 2008. "Do U.S. Gambling Industries Cannibalize Each Other?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 36(3), pages 308-333, May.
    8. Earl L. Grinols & David B. Mustard, 2001. "Business profitability versus social profitability: evaluating industries with externalities, the case of casinos," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1-3), pages 143-162.
    9. Hicks, Michael J. & Wilburn, Kristy L., 2001. "The Regional Impact of Wal-Mart Entrance: A Panel Study of the Retail Trade Sector in West Virginia," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 31(3), pages 305-313, Winter.
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    Cited by:

    1. Karl Geisler & Mark Nichols, 2016. "Riverboat casino gambling impacts on employment and income in host and surrounding counties," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(1), pages 101-123, January.
    2. repec:bla:growch:v:48:y:2017:i:3:p:409-434 is not listed on IDEAS

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