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Do U.S. Gambling Industries Cannibalize Each Other?

Author

Listed:
  • Douglas M. Walker

    (College of Charleston, South Carolina)

  • John D. Jackson

    (Auburn University, Alabama)

Abstract

Many states facing recent fiscal crises have looked to legalized gambling in an attempt to ease fiscal constraints. Although there has been some research on the economic effects of gambling, no study has offered a comprehensive analysis of the interindustry relationships of lotteries, casinos, horse racing, and greyhound racing. In this article, we use seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) estimation to analyze the relationships among gambling industries in the United States. Our results indicate that some industries “cannibalize†each other (e.g., casinos and lotteries, and horse and dog racing), whereas other industries help each other (e.g., casinos and horse racing, dog racing and lotteries, and horse racing and lotteries). The study also examines the effects of adjacent-state gambling and a variety of demographic variables. This analysis provides a foundation for further research on how to optimize tax revenues from legalized gambling.

Suggested Citation

  • Douglas M. Walker & John D. Jackson, 2008. "Do U.S. Gambling Industries Cannibalize Each Other?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 36(3), pages 308-333, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:pubfin:v:36:y:2008:i:3:p:308-333
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael J. Hicks, 2014. "Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? The Cross Border Impact of Casino Entrance," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 5-20, March.
    2. Philander, Kahlil S. & Bernhard, Bo J. & Wimmer, Bradley S. & Singh, Ashok K. & Eadington, William R., 2015. "U.S. casino revenue taxes and short-run labor outcomes," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 35-46.
    3. Humphreys, Brad R. & Marchand, Joseph, 2013. "New casinos and local labor markets: Evidence from Canada," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 151-160.
    4. Peter Calcagno & Douglas Walker & John Jackson, 2010. "Determinants of the probability and timing of commercial casino legalization in the United States," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 142(1), pages 69-90, January.

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