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International Oligopoly and the Taxation of Commerce with Revenue-Constrained Governments




We evaluate the incentives for strategic commodity tax-setting under destination and origin regimes when competition is imperfect and commodity taxes must be used to finance the government budget. Different cases of international duopoly are compared, where firms compete over quantities or prices and markets are segmented or integrated. In each setting the international spillovers of tax policy are isolated and evaluated at the Pareto-efficient tax rate. We find that origin-based commodity taxation leads to a downward competition of tax rates in each of the models analysed, whereas no similarly broad-based incentives for beggar-thy-neighbour policies exist under the destination principle. Copyright (c) The London School of Economics and Political Science 2006.

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  • Andreas Haufler & Michael Pflüger, 2007. "International Oligopoly and the Taxation of Commerce with Revenue-Constrained Governments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(295), pages 451-473, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:74:y:2007:i:295:p:451-473

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Behrens, Kristian & Hamilton, Jonathan & Ottaviano, Gianmarco & Thisse, Jacques-François, 2004. "Destination- versus Origin-based Commodity Taxation and the Location of Industry," CEPR Discussion Papers 4671, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Haufler, Andreas & Pflüger, Michael, 2003. "Market structure and the taxation of international trade," Discussion Papers in Economics 106, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    3. Jacques-Bernard Sauner-Leroy, 2003. "The impact of the implementation of the Single Market Programme on productive efficiency and on mark-ups in the European Union manufacturing industry," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 192, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    4. Jagdish Bhagwati & Arvind Panagariya & T. N. Srinivasan, 1998. "Lectures on International Trade, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262522470, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Braun, Sebastian & Spielmann, Christian, 2012. "Wage subsidies and international trade: When does policy coordination pay?," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 6, pages 1-42.
    2. Krebs, Oliver & Pflüger, Michael P., 2015. "How Deep Is Your Love? A Quantitative Spatial Analysis of the Transatlantic Trade Partnership," IZA Discussion Papers 9021, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis & Schmitt, Nicolas, 2010. "Commodity taxation and parallel imports," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1-2), pages 153-162, February.
    4. Moriconi, Simone & Sato, Yasuhiro, 2009. "International commodity taxation in the presence of unemployment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(7-8), pages 939-949, August.
    5. Behrens, Kristian & Hamilton, Jonathan H. & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Thisse, Jacques-François, 2009. "Commodity tax competition and industry location under the destination and the origin principle," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 422-433, July.
    6. Fabio Antoniou & Panos Hatzipanayotou & Nikos Tsakiris, 2015. "Destination vs. Origin-based Commodity Taxation in Large Open Economies with Unemployment," CESifo Working Paper Series 5585, CESifo Group Munich.

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