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The Impact Of Gender On Voluntary And Involuntary Executive Departure




"We examine the frequency and conditions of executive departure from S&P 1500 firms. Based upon published news reports, we find that female executives are more likely than male executives to depart their positions voluntarily and involuntarily in the presence of controls for firm performance, firm governance, and human capital. We also find that women are less likely than men to depart voluntarily as firm size increases or board size decreases but more likely to be dismissed as the board becomes more male dominated. "("JEL" G30, G32, G34, J44) Copyright (c) 2009 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • John R. Becker-Blease & Susan Elkinawy & Mark Stater, 2010. "The Impact Of Gender On Voluntary And Involuntary Executive Departure," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(4), pages 1102-1118, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:48:y:2010:i:4:p:1102-1118

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Warner, Jerold B. & Watts, Ross L. & Wruck, Karen H., 1988. "Stock prices and top management changes," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1-2), pages 461-492, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul M. Guest, 2016. "Executive Mobility and Minority Status," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 604-631, October.
    2. repec:spr:jecfin:v:42:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s12197-017-9390-1 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G30 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - General
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • G34 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Mergers; Acquisitions; Restructuring; Corporate Governance
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations


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