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Explaining the Recent Decline in Domestic Violence

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  • Amy Farmer
  • Jill Tiefenthaler

Abstract

According to the Department of Justice (DOJ), the incidence of domestic violence decreased during the 1990s. Understanding the causes of this decline could offer important insight into designing effective policies to continue this trend. This article uses the Area-Identified National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), the same data used to generate the DOJ's national estimates, merged with county-level variables, to examine the determinants of women reporting abuse. The results indicate that there are three important factors that likely contribute to the decline: (1) the increased provision of legal services for victims of intimate partner abuse, (2) improvements in women's economic status, and (3) demographic trends, most notably the aging of the population. Copyright 2003 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Amy Farmer & Jill Tiefenthaler, 2003. "Explaining the Recent Decline in Domestic Violence," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(2), pages 158-172, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:21:y:2003:i:2:p:158-172
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amy Farmer & Jill Tiefenthaler, 1997. "An Economic Analysis of Domestic Violence," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 55(3), pages 337-358.
    2. Borjas, George J, 1999. "Immigration and Welfare Magnets," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages 607-637, October.
    3. Enchautegui, Maria E, 1997. "Welfare Payments and Other Economic Determinants of Female Migration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(3), pages 529-554, July.
    4. Blank, Rebecca M., 1988. "The effect of welfare and wage levels on the location decisions of female-headed households," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 186-211, September.
    5. Tauchen, Helen V & Witte, Ann Dryden & Long, Sharon K, 1991. "Domestic Violence: A Nonrandom Affair," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 32(2), pages 491-511, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan D. Barón§, 2010. "La violencia de pareja en Colombia y sus regiones," Documentos de trabajo sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 128, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    2. Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2015. "Victimisation, Wellbeing and Compensation: Using Panel Data to Estimate the Costs of Violent Crime," IZA Discussion Papers 9311, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Augusto Mendoza Calderón, 2017. "El Efecto del Empleo sobre la Violencia Doméstica: Evidencia para las Mujeres Peruanas," Working Papers 2017-99, Peruvian Economic Association.
    4. Allen, W. David, 2009. "Interview effects in the reporting of domestic violence," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 288-300, March.
    5. Tatiana Damjanovic & Geethanjali Selvaretnam, 2015. "Economic Growth and Evolution of Gender Equality," Working Papers 2015_20, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    6. Iyengar, Radha, 2009. "Does the certainty of arrest reduce domestic violence? Evidence from mandatory and recommended arrest laws," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 85-98, February.
    7. Duncan, Brian & Mansour, Hani & Rees, Daniel I., 2015. "Prenatal Stress and Low Birth Weight: Evidence from the Super Bowl," IZA Discussion Papers 9053, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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