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Economic Openness and Subjective Well-being in China

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  • Wen Xin
  • Russell Smyth

Abstract

Using a large household survey administered across 30 cities in September 2003, we examine the relationship between the degree of economic openness, measured as the sum of imports and exports as a share of GDP, and subjective well-being in urban China. We find that respondents who live in cities with high levels of economic openness report significantly lower levels of subjective well-being ceteris paribus. We offer four explanations for this result; namely, inadequate social protection in the face of globalization, unfulfilled expectations, political dissatisfaction and anomie. Copyright (c) 2010 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2010 Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

Suggested Citation

  • Wen Xin & Russell Smyth, 2010. "Economic Openness and Subjective Well-being in China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 18(2), pages 22-40.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:chinae:v:18:y:2010:i:2:p:22-40
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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Dluhosch & Daniel Horgos, 2013. "Trading Up the Happiness Ladder," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(3), pages 973-990, September.
    2. Benjamin Schalembier, 2016. "The Impact of Exposure to Other Countries on Life Satisfaction: An International Application of the Relative Income Hypothesis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 221-239, August.
    3. repec:spr:soinre:v:132:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-015-1126-z is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ying Liang & Demi Zhu, 2015. "Subjective Well-Being of Chinese Landless Peasants in Relatively Developed Regions: Measurement Using PANAS and SWLS," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 817-835, September.

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