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Life Satisfaction in Urban China: Components and Determinants

Author

Listed:
  • Song, Lina

    () (University of Nottingham)

  • Appleton, Simon

    () (University of Nottingham)

Abstract

Survey data from urban China in 2002 show levels of life satisfaction to be low, but not exceptionally so, by international comparison. Many of the determinants of life satisfaction in urban China appear comparable to those for people in other countries. These include, inter alia, unemployment, income, marriage, sex, health and age. Communist Party membership and political participation raise life satisfaction. People appear fairly satisfied with economic growth and low inflation, and this contributes to their overall life satisfaction. There is dissatisfaction over pollution, but this – like job insecurity – does not appear to impact on life satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Song, Lina & Appleton, Simon, 2008. "Life Satisfaction in Urban China: Components and Determinants," IZA Discussion Papers 3443, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3443
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic growth; happiness; life satisfaction; unemployment; China;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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