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A Multilevel Analysis of Job Demands and Intention to Resign Through Perceived Service Recovery Performance

Author

Listed:
  • Khansa Zaman

    () (MBA, MS Project Management at National Defence University, Islamabad)

  • Muhammad Saeed Rana

    (Assistant Professor, SZABIST, Islamabad Campus)

  • Umer Iftikhar

    (Assistant Professor at National Defence University Islamabad.)

Abstract

The present study investigates the influence of job demands on intention to resign of front line employees (FLEs) of courier industry. Moreover, it also focuses on neglected area of perceived service recovery performance which is the fundamental aspect of success in services industry. The current study incorporates perceived service recovery performance as mediator between job demands and intention to resign under the light of social exchange theory. Past literature of services is deplete with studies on banking industry, food industry, and transport and tourism industry, however, the courier industry is neglected regarding front line employees. Thus, this study responds to call for research by drawing a random sampling of 700 front line employees and their direct supervisors of courier industry. The results reflected that higher job demands results in intention to resign and reduce service recovery performance. Researchers have also discussed the limitation and direction for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Khansa Zaman & Muhammad Saeed Rana & Umer Iftikhar, 2019. "A Multilevel Analysis of Job Demands and Intention to Resign Through Perceived Service Recovery Performance," Business & Economic Review, Institute of Management Sciences, Peshawar, Pakistan, vol. 11(2), pages 67-82, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bec:imsber:v:11:y:2019:i:2:p:67-82
    DOI: dx.doi.org/10.22547/BER/11.2.4
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    File URL: http://imsciences.edu.pk/files/journals/volume11no2/New%205%20543.%20MA.pdf
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