IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Incentives of small countries to participate in a global free trade agreement in agriculture: a theoretical analysis

Listed author(s):
  • May, Daniel E.
Registered author(s):

    During the last two decades a number of international rounds have been carried out with the objective of reaching a global free trade agreement in agriculture (GFTA). However, little progress has been made. A recent theoretical research based on the new literature on international trade networks revealed that the existing lack of agricultural liberalisation could equate to a structural problem under the assumption of identical countries in market size. The present article extends this new research to study in particular the incentives of small countries such as Chile to deviate from GFTA (i.e. when countries are asymmetric in market size)

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/142623
    Download Restriction: no

    Article provided by Agrarian Economist Association (AEA), Chile in its journal Economia Agraria.

    Volume (Year): 15 (2011)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages:

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:ags:eaaeac:142623
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.aeachile.cl/

    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. Sanjeev Goyal & Sumit Joshi, 2006. "Bilateralism And Free Trade," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(3), pages 749-778, 08.
    2. Daniel May, 2011. "Agricultural trade liberalization under bilateralism: an international network perspective," Portuguese Economic Journal, Springer;Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestao, vol. 10(1), pages 23-34, April.
    3. Reimer Jeffrey J & Stiegert Kyle, 2006. "Imperfect Competition and Strategic Trade Theory: Evidence for International Food and Agricultural Markets," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-27, September.
    4. Steve McCorriston, 2002. "Why should imperfect competition matter to agricultural economists?," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 349-371, July.
    5. Stephen Devadoss, 2006. "Why do developing countries resist global trade agreements?," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 191-208.
    6. Boehlje, Michael & Doering, Otto C., III, 2000. "Farm Policy In An Industrialized Agriculture," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 18(1), March.
    7. Daniel E. May, 2008. "Is Bilateralism Consistent with Global Free Trade?," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 7(2), pages 137-152, August.
    8. Gardner, Bruce L, 1987. "Causes of U.S. Farm Commodity Programs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(2), pages 290-310, April.
    9. Gary S. Becker, 1983. "A Theory of Competition Among Pressure Groups for Political Influence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 98(3), pages 371-400.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:eaaeac:142623. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.