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Farm Policy In An Industrialized Agriculture


  • Boehlje, Michael
  • Doering, Otto C., III


The structural changes that will impact agriculture over the next decade will be profound. The economic benefits of the dual dimensions of industrialization of agriculture-implementation of a manufacturing approach to the food and industrial product production and distribution chain, and negotiated coordination among the stages in that chain are expected to result in a much more industrialized agricultural sector. The implications of this industrialization process for agricultural markets and market policy, and agricultural policy in general, are critical. The focal point of this discussion is the set of public policy options that might be considered to shape the future structure of the agricultural sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Boehlje, Michael & Doering, Otto C., III, 2000. "Farm Policy In An Industrialized Agriculture," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 18(1), March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jloagb:14708

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael Boehlje, 1999. "Structural Changes in the Agricultural Industries: How Do We Measure, Analyze and Understand Them?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1028-1041.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kherallah, Mylene & Kirsten, Johann F, 2002. "The New Institutional Economics: Applications For Agricultural Policy Research In Developing Countries," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 41(2), June.
    2. Bor, Özgür, 1. "Agrarian Transformation: Power And Dominance In Markets," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 1.
    3. Sartorius, Kurt & Kirsten, Johann, 2007. "A framework to facilitate institutional arrangements for smallholder supply in developing countries: An agribusiness perspective," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5-6), pages 640-655.
    4. Masuku, MB & Kirsten, JF & Van Rooyen, CJ & Perret, S, 2003. "Contractual Relationships Between Small-Holder Sugarcane Growers And Millers In The Sugar Industry Supply Chain In Swaziland," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 42(3), September.
    5. Sartorius, K & Kirsten, J, 2002. "Can Small-Scale Farmers Be Linked To Agribusiness? The Timber Experience," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 41(4), December.
    6. Daniel May, 2011. "Agricultural trade liberalization under bilateralism: an international network perspective," Portuguese Economic Journal, Springer;Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestao, vol. 10(1), pages 23-34, April.
    7. Kherallah, Mylène & Kirsten, Johann, 2001. "The new institutional economics," MSSD discussion papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. May, Daniel E., 2011. "Incentives of small countries to participate in a global free trade agreement in agriculture: a theoretical analysis," Economia Agraria y Recursos Naturales, Spanish Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 15.
    9. Amanor-Boadu, Vincent, 2004. "Post-market surveillance model for potential human health effects of novel foods," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 609-620, December.
    10. May, Daniel E., 2011. "Incentives of small countries to participate in a global free trade agreement in agriculture: a theoretical analysis," Economia Agraria, Agrarian Economist Association (AEA), Chile, vol. 15.
    11. Daniel Esteban May, 2012. "Addressing biodiversity loss when international markets of agricultural commodities are oligopolistic," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 1(1), pages 53-57.


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