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Distortions in farmer prices since 1950s: South Africa in international perspective

  • Anderson, Kym
  • de Nicola, Francesca
  • Jara, Esteban
  • Kurzweil, Marianne
  • Sandri, Damiano
  • Valenzuela, Ernesto

For decades, earnings from farming in many low-income countries have been depressed by a pro-urban bias in own-country policies, as well as by governments of richer countries favoring their farmers with import barriers and subsidies. Both sets of policies reduce national and global economic growth. They also add to inequality and poverty in developing countries, since most of the world's billion poorest people depend on farming for their livelihood. Over the past two decades numerous developing country governments have reduced their sectoral and trade policy distortions, while some high-income countries also have begun reforming their protectionist policies. Drawing on results from a new multi-country research project, this paper examines the extent of South Africa's reforms relative to those of other temperate-zone Southern Hemisphere countries, of Northern Hemisphere rich countries, and of other developing countries. It concludes by pointing to the scope and prospects for further pro-poor policy reform at home and abroad.

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Article provided by Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA) in its journal Agrekon.

Volume (Year): 46 (2007)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)

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Handle: RePEc:ags:agreko:8017
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  1. Warr, Peter G., 1978. "The Case Against Tariff Compensation," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 22(02-03).
  2. Valdes, Alberto & Jara, Esteban, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Chile," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48391, World Bank.
  3. De Gorter, Harry & Swinnen, Johan, 2002. "Political economy of agricultural policy," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 36, pages 1893-1943 Elsevier.
  4. Gardner, Bruce L., 2008. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in the United States and Canada," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48573, World Bank.
  5. Honma, Masayoshi & Hayami, Yujiro, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Korea and Taiwan," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48479, World Bank.
  6. Kym Anderson & Will Martin, 2009. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Asia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2611.
  7. William FOSTER & William FOSTER, 2006. "Chilean Agriculture And Major Economic Reforms: Growth, Trade, Poverty And The Environment," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 23, pages 187-214.
  8. Anderson, Kym & Lattimore, Ralph G. & Lloyd, Peter J. & MacLaren, Donald, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Australia and New Zealand," 2007 Conference (51st), February 13-16, 2007, Queenstown, New Zealand 10407, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  9. Kirsten, Johann F. & Edwards, Lawrence & Vink, Nick, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in South Africa," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48514, World Bank.
  10. Lloyd, Peter J., 1975. "Tariff Compensation: An Undesirable Policy," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 19(03), December.
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