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Germanys Energiewende: A Tale of Increasing Costs and Decreasing Willingness-To-Pay

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  • Mark A. Andor, Manuel Frondel, and Colin Vance

Abstract

This paper presents evidence that the accumulating cost of Germany's ambitious plan to transform its system of energy provision - the so-called Energiewende - is butting up against consumers' willingness-to-pay (WTP) for it. Following a descriptive presentation that traces the German promotion of renewable energy technologies since 2000, we draw on two stated-preference surveys conducted in 2013 and 2015 that elicit the households' WTP for green electricity. Two models are estimated, one based on a closed-ended question framed around Germany's target of 35% renewable energy in electricity provision by 2020, and the other on an open-ended format that captures changes in WTP over time. To deal with the bias that typifies hypothetical responses, the models distinguish respondents according to whether they express definite certainty in their reported WTP. The results from both models reveal a strong contrast between the households' general acceptance of supporting renewable energy technologies and their own WTP for green electricity.

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  • Mark A. Andor, Manuel Frondel, and Colin Vance, 2017. "Germanys Energiewende: A Tale of Increasing Costs and Decreasing Willingness-To-Pay," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(KAPSARC S).
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:ej38-si1-frondel
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    Cited by:

    1. Manuel Frondel and Gerhard Kussel, 2019. "Switching on Electricity Demand Response: Evidence for German Households," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 5).
    2. Frondel, Manuel, 2017. "Deutschlands Klimapolitik: Höchste Zeit für einen Strategiewechsel," RWI Materialien 117, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
    3. Frondel, Manuel & Kussel, Gerhard & Sommer, Stephan, 2019. "Heterogeneity in the price response of residential electricity demand: A dynamic approach for Germany," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 119-134.
    4. Andor, Mark Andreas & Frondel, Manuel & Sommer, Stephan, 2018. "Equity and the willingness to pay for green electricity in Germany," Ruhr Economic Papers 759, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    5. Andor, Mark A. & Schmidt, Christoph M. & Sommer, Stephan, 2018. "Climate Change, Population Ageing and Public Spending: Evidence on Individual Preferences," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 173-183.
    6. Newbery, David & Pollitt, Michael G. & Ritz, Robert A. & Strielkowski, Wadim, 2018. "Market design for a high-renewables European electricity system," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 695-707.
    7. Simora, Michael & Frondel, Manuel & Vance, Colin, 2018. "Does financial compensation increase the acceptance of power lines? Evidence from Germany," Ruhr Economic Papers 742, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    8. Cheung, Grace & Davies, Peter J. & Bassen, Alexander, 2019. "In the transition of energy systems: What lessons can be learnt from the German achievement?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 633-646.
    9. Karneyeva, Yuliya & Wüstenhagen, Rolf, 2017. "Solar feed-in tariffs in a post-grid parity world: The role of risk, investor diversity and business models," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 445-456.
    10. Beyer, Gregor & Borchers, Dagmar & Frondel, Manuel & Hrach, Marcus & Kutzschbauch, Ole & Menges, Roland & Sommer, Stephan & Traub, Stefan, 2017. "Die gesellschaftliche Akzeptanz der Energiewende: Befunde eines interdisziplinären Forschungsprojektes," RWI Materialien 116, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.

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